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Thread: Is it necessary to lube up a brand new mountain bike?

  1. #11
    Senior Member floody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by driftking View Post
    When I did some work in the shops most high end builds like giants come with everything together, all you do it put the front wheel on, do the front end, seat post. Then Check all the bolts etc. we use grease but the problem is the amount of work the shop does is little so a lot of the work is in the factory.
    All the more reason to do it. Another issue is that if things do come lubed up its often with crappy clay based lube which breaks down or varnishes quickly (think of it as an assembly prep not a long term lube).

    IMO a higher end bike - and not saying this as a bikesnob, just because the $:Benefit isn't there doing this with a $300 bike plus tolerances are tighter with better parts - should have all or most of the following things checked and lubed:
    -BB cups in frame
    -Crank axle
    -QR Skewers/maxles/QR15/X12 etc
    -Seatpost (friction compound for instead for carbon items)
    -Stem bolts
    -Exposed mating surfaces of headset parts (e.g. most stuff above the top cup, crown race, upper race)
    -Pedal threads
    -Chain (lube, clean, lube, clean!)
    -Handlebar (friction compound or very light greasing)

    The following should be checked for tightness and torqued, loctited or both
    -Chainring bolts
    -Stem and seat clamp bolts
    -Brake mount bolts
    -Pivot point clamp bolts
    -Shock bolts

    Gear and (if fitted) brake cables should be pulled tight so ferrules seat properly onto housings and into frame.

    Thats a short list, if doing a frame up build you'd probably face BB, chase BB, face headset and brake mounts, swish some Lanolin protectant around in the frame of a steel bike etc.

    If you do all this you significantly minimise the amount of things coming back in the short term with mystery creaks, rattles in the rear suspension, suddenly out of 'tune' gears etc.

    Bike works well out of the box and doesn't require servicing 7 days later due to all the stuff thats moved against each other/opened up tolerance/absorbed moisture/lube dried out, happy customer. In my experience, faith in a shop's ability to nail the build and preservice helps a lot in garnering return business and customer confidence in accessory/replacement/upgrade suggestions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Wilde
    Quotation is a serviceable substitute for wit.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by floody View Post
    All the more reason to do it. Another issue is that if things do come lubed up its often with crappy clay based lube which breaks down or varnishes quickly (think of it as an assembly prep not a long term lube).
    yeah that was my point, at the store they should do what they can but most of it is pre build to the shop so the factory is the worry.
    My grandfather has the heart of a lion and a lifetime ban from the zoo

  3. #13
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    Thanks everyone for all your input =)

    I'm not comfortable doing the things that floody suggested yet- I've got no special tools or experience with bottom brackets and crank axles and stuff but maybe if there was a youtube video on rebuilding the linkages. I dont understand what you'd do? Wouldn't the bearings be sealed?

    Anyway this is the list of things that I'm comfortable doing and that I'll do when I get it:

    So far I've got: check tyre pressure, lube maxles, put a dab of grease on the headset, stem and bar bolts and torque them?, clean and lube the chain, ride the bike down the hill fast several times and brake hard to bed the brakes in, will put a dab of grease on the threads of my new pedals when I get them, check the bolts on the chainring, brake mounts, shock and linkage.


    In like 6 months I'll change the fork oil, I can find tons of info on changing the fork oil but theres nothing on changing the shock oil. I get that its more dangerous but could you do it yourself?

    Mike.
    A 2009 KTM 250SX, 2011 Giant Reign SX and Giant OCR1

  4. #14
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    As a bike builder, I see what comes in a is prepared well. Giant is amazing at prepping their bikes, and mostly everything is ready to go out of the box, only the pedal spindles and seatpost need some grease. If you like going over and being pedantic with you bike, it is good to undo bolts such as on the stem, seatpost, and bottle cages, and put some grease on as they usually aren't done in the factory.

  5. #15
    Senior Member floody's Avatar
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    Mike, what you've listed will go a long way to keeping your bike quiet and smooth, good stuff. I loctite chainring bolts - just a drop - as a matter of course now, have lost a few in the past.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Wilde
    Quotation is a serviceable substitute for wit.

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