2020 Bike Models & Pricing..

mik_git

Likes Bikes and Dirt
;)
You can ride more when you don't have a job!
Yep, been unemplyed for a bit the riding was great, the bike buying was crap... now this working thing, have more money (but somehow not loads more...grrr) and no damn time to ride, had to take a day off the last week so my brain didn't explode and I could get a ride in, and this riding at -3 in the dark before work is unpleasant no matter how much goretex and thermal I throw at myself!
 

Calvin27

Eats Squid
There must be something if people are going to pay that much - bupa discount or not
I think they used to be ok on sale, but now a bit expensive. I don't think it's just Trek, other brands are upping prices. Giants and Kona I have noticed have crept up the price range - maybe I did the right thing buying when our dollar was high (I avoided the boost crap in doing so too!). But the reality nowadays is I generally set Canyon as the benchmark and go from there. Even with local support and services though treks still cost a bit more imo. And they persist with stupid BB standards (at least for road).
 

MARKL

Eats Squid
Do they ever go down in price when the Aussie dollar climbs ?
They must have at some point. When I bought my first mountain bike, 98 Specialized FSR Comp it was around $3,000, bit more for the Extreme version etc. The Shaun Palmer FSR down hill bike was nearly $9k...

Dollar was hopeless back then and it was reflected in bike prices

No they just went up less.
Here's how it works. When the dollers good, we have heaps more to spend so they only put it up a little to cover double inflation. When the dollers bad, they put it up a lot to offset the less number of people buying. It's not that hard people. Basic Mafs.
In January 2018 $1 Australian dollar bought US$0.80 today it buys US$0.70.

Basic math on a US$3,000 purchase that equates to 2018 $3,750 vs today $4,286

The other thing to remember is that most large importers hedge themselves against currency fluctuations in various ways. Which sometimes means the impact of currency movements may be delayed or offset - this may mean you can delay one round of currency changes but them have to hit your market with a bigger change down the track.

And remember we will always get reamed by the importers at any chance
 

mas2

Likes Dirt
In January 2018 $1 Australian dollar bought US$0.80 today it buys US$0.70.

Basic math on a US$3,000 purchase that equates to 2018 $3,750 vs today $4,286

The other thing to remember is that most large importers hedge themselves against currency fluctuations in various ways. Which sometimes means the impact of currency movements may be delayed or offset - this may mean you can delay one round of currency changes but them have to hit your market with a bigger change down the track.

And remember we will always get reamed by the importers at any chance
My previous reply was just sarcasm but the math still doesn't add up based just on inflation with the numbers OP quoted.

The RRP quoted at the start was $3500 AUD in 2018 vs $4500 AUD now.
$3500 in 2018 USD at 0.8 rate is $2800
$4500 in 2019 USD at 0.7 rate is $3150
Even taking into account inflation thats a $350 USD difference so its probably a combo deal of our dollar getting weaker and their RRP going up.

What worries me though is how low our dollar can/will go...
 
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