COVID-19: who’s going full doomsday prep on this?

leitch

Feelin' a bit rrranty
Well there you go!

A curfew! No-one saw that coming...
Yeah. Seems a bit hardcore at face value but I guess it’s more about preventing the pizza and KFC parties, and making enforcement easier. Also allows diversion of resources to daytime enforcement/monitoring - PSOs usually on trains etc can be redeployed to daytime community beats etc.
 

Kerplunk

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Yeah. Seems a bit hardcore at face value but I guess it’s more about preventing the pizza and KFC parties, and making enforcement easier. Also allows diversion of resources to daytime enforcement/monitoring - PSOs usually on trains etc can be redeployed to daytime community beats etc.
And if you look at the curfew rules, apart from exercise, you are allowed to move for work, chemist etc.. Depends on what work is left mind you..
 

mike14

Likes Dirt
Yeah. Seems a bit hardcore at face value but I guess it’s more about preventing the pizza and KFC parties, and making enforcement easier. Also allows diversion of resources to daytime enforcement/monitoring - PSOs usually on trains etc can be redeployed to daytime community beats etc.
And this is where it starts to get murky. PSO positions were created to patrol train stations. They get 12 weeks of training which is less than half of that for a police officer. Just how much jurisdiction and power should they have, and how much additional oversight is being placed around them to ensure that they are capable of doing the job correctly?
 

pink poodle

Our man in Japan
And this is where it starts to get murky. PSO positions were created to patrol train stations. They get 12 weeks of training which is less than half of that for a police officer. Just how much jurisdiction and power should they have, and how much additional oversight is being placed around them to ensure that they are capable of doing the job correctly?
Would you rather soldiers?
 

leitch

Feelin' a bit rrranty
And this is where it starts to get murky. PSO positions were created to patrol train stations. They get 12 weeks of training which is less than half of that for a police officer. Just how much jurisdiction and power should they have, and how much additional oversight is being placed around them to ensure that they are capable of doing the job correctly?
To exercise their powers they have to be operating at a “designated place” - they also provide security at some court locations for example. Presumably new deployments would involve temporary designation of places like shopping centres Like Highpoint, Bourke St mall etc - other usually high traffic areas where you might want increased presence to monitor foot traffic/deter people from hanging out as opposed to just buying their groceries and fucking off. E.g. avoiding the massive crowds like at Costco this morning. PSOs are qualified for that, have the power to issue fines, and are more accountable than random security contractors as we’ve recently discovered.
 

glenn1529

Likes Dirt
And this is where it starts to get murky. PSO positions were created to patrol train stations. They get 12 weeks of training which is less than half of that for a police officer. Just how much jurisdiction and power should they have, and how much additional oversight is being placed around them to ensure that they are capable of doing the job correctly?
At least one week was dedicated to which passengers can I screw though, surely?
 

wkkie

Does my arse look big on this saddle?
And this is where it starts to get murky. PSO positions were created to patrol train stations. They get 12 weeks of training which is less than half of that for a police officer. Just how much jurisdiction and power should they have, and how much additional oversight is being placed around them to ensure that they are capable of doing the job correctly?
The covid rules have come in recently, police and PSO's have both had the same amount of time to get around the rules. There's no difference between the 2 with enforcement. It's pretty straight forward to enforce.
 

mike14

Likes Dirt
To exercise their powers they have to be operating at a “designated place” - they also provide security at some court locations for example. Presumably new deployments would involve temporary designation of places like shopping centres Like Highpoint, Bourke St mall etc - other usually high traffic areas where you might want increased presence to monitor foot traffic/deter people from hanging out as opposed to just buying their groceries and fucking off. E.g. avoiding the massive crowds like at Costco this morning. PSOs are qualified for that, have the power to issue fines, and are more accountable than random security contractors as we’ve recently discovered.
That's my concern. The 'mission creep' has already started by extending their designated place. Now we are extending it further.
Can a PSO enter your house to check if you have too many visitors? Did you need to inform them of where you are traveling to and why?
 

mike14

Likes Dirt
The covid rules have come in recently, police and PSO's have both had the same amount of time to get around the rules. There's no difference between the 2 with enforcement. It's pretty straight forward to enforce.
But there is a large difference in training (this is IMO based on observation of PSOs on the job, and some work my company did with VicPol).
 

wkkie

Does my arse look big on this saddle?
But there is a large difference in training (this is IMO based on observation of PSOs on the job, and some work my company did with VicPol).
Overall, yes. But for covid compliance, no.

And I'd take some PSO's over some police anytime from what I've seen. But like anything, any line of work, there's good and bad in all.
 

wkkie

Does my arse look big on this saddle?
And as I said above, just what is 'compliance' and how far does it go? And what incident has to occur before someone says "yeah, that's probably outside your jurisdiction"?
The covid stuff will be rolled back with the state of emergency, so will the powers of the PSO's in that example, so wouldn't worry to much in that example.

But no doubt something will change again down the track. Really, they should have just more police in place to begin with.
 

mike14

Likes Dirt
The covid stuff will be rolled back with the state of emergency, so will the powers of the PSO's in that example, so wouldn't worry to much in that example.

But no doubt something will change again down the track. Really, they should have just more police in place to begin with.
Agree with this. Extra police in the community is a good thing. I'd just prefer ones with better training than what the PSOs tend to get (and make no mistake there's some damn good PSOs, including at least 2 former soldiers I know, I'm talking collectively with regard to the above)
 

leitch

Feelin' a bit rrranty
PSOs are good for VicPol because they cost less but can fulfil most of the enforcement/deterrent functions of police in lower-risk community settings without necessitating the redeployment of sworn officers from emergency/000 response etc.

Given their statutory functions I wouldn’t expect to see them patrolling the community (door knocking COVID cases etc), so no they can’t come into your house. If you were at a train station or a shopping centre yes they could ask for your reason/destination of travel, which is what we’re want in terms of enforcement of COVID regulations. Acknowledging it’s an assumption, I would assume that’s why ADF has been doing the door knocking to date.

In principle I don’t have a problem with PSOs forming part of the policing strategy around public gathering areas and having appropriate powers to those settings, but I’d rather they didn’t carry guns.
 
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