hope tech3 lever throw-bleeding

Discussion in 'Parts 'n Stuff' started by freeriding, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    Hallo! I have the tech 3 v4 brakes, they are amazing! I have 3 questions:

    • how do i reduce the lever throw? I have the pad contact fully in, but would like a little less throw. I have avid rotors, think hope rotors may be a bit fatter?
    • i read that except for the classic bleed procedure, there is a reverse one, from the caliper to the lever body. How is it performed? Has it any advantages over the classic one?
    • for more raw power (since i experience no fade with the organic pads), should i go organic or sintered? Any brand that has better pads than the stock hope?
     
  2. pink poodle

    pink poodle Clinically Inane

    I love my hope brakes too. I like plenty of throw in my lever, if it translates to modulation. In answer to your questions...

    1) wind everything out all the way. Lever reach, pad contact, what ever you have...open it up. Then bleed the brakes. Once that is done adjust reach and pad contact to suit. I run shimano rotors with my hopes, no worries.

    2) I have never done this, but those that do swear they get less air in the line after the bleed because air rises in liquid.

    3) I just run hope pads. They make me happy. Sintered pads will generally have more grab than organic.
     
    teK-- likes this.
  3. yuley95

    yuley95 Likes Dirt

    Magura rotors are a bit thicker. Not sure about hope rotors.

    Experiment a bit with different brand pads and compounds. I find Swissstop make some great pads and I’ve tried a lot of different brands.
     
  4. Oddjob

    Oddjob Eats Squid

    To reduce throw, remove the wheel and gently press the lever. The pistons should come out further than they would otherwise and will not retract all the way. You need to be careful though. Take your time and do a little bit at a time.

    For more power always go sintered. The stock Hope pads are good but I've found Clarks and EBC to be good too.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
     
    teK-- likes this.
  5. Daniel Hale

    Daniel Hale Likes Dirt

    reverse bleed is much easier imo, can do a classic first if its a new line, if already has fluid, open top reservoir, drip fluid in, pump that lever hard, fluid will drop slightly, keep topping up till fluid level doesn't go down...MOST important -be very craeful putting the rubber gasket back in -easiest way to get an air bubble under it & screw up your bleed -don't drop it in -place one end in place then slowly lower the other end till its flat
     
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  6. teK--

    teK-- Eats Squid

    Agree with all of above. Don't need to buy thicker rotors just bleed with BP adjustment all the way out and then advance pistons with wheel out if you need even closer aftet the BP is wound all the way in .
     
  7. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    I f i do this procedure, in reality, i will make way for more dot volume in the system. Won't there be a problem with the seals (eg if the dot expands)? I think the proper way, is to have the pistons all in when you bleed the brakes.

    Another similar way one told me, was when one finishes the bleed process (the official), one can insert more fluid with a syringe in the caliper bleed port. This works, as he told me, and i assume it's essentially the same thing as the above.
     
  8. Oddjob

    Oddjob Eats Squid

    The procedure is meant to be done post bleed. The Hope reservoir has more than enough capacity to deal with pistons moving in because they have to, to deal with pad wear. The system remains closed thanks to a rubber diaphragm compensating for the extra fluid in the caliper.

    If you add more fluid, you might get problems later as the Dot absorbs water.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
     
  9. teK--

    teK-- Eats Squid

    Not at all. Aren't suggesting you put any more fluid in system as usual, just advancing the pistons out further which they would normally do to compensate for pad wear. I always bleed with a bleed block in place to ensure correct fluid volume.
     
    Sethius likes this.
  10. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    Thank you guys!

    To reduce throw, remove the wheel and gently press the lever. The pistons should come out further than they would otherwise and will not retract all the way.

    So, if i understand correctly, you finish the bleeding process, as indicated here, and then you remove the wheel and gently press the lever until the pistons come closer to the rotor (if the rotor was there).

    Am i correct? If there is rub, after you put the wheel back on (because of tiny clearance), then you retract the pads with a screwdriver until you get the best possible combination of lever throw-no rub?
     
  11. Oddjob

    Oddjob Eats Squid

    Yep. Better to go slow and avoided having to retract. Ps plastic tyre levers are the go for pushing levers in.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
     
  12. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    The best way to do this i guess, is to put this spacer between the pads (and maybe play with the bottom part of it, which is gradually reducing)[​IMG]

    Then, after finishing the procedure of the pistons coming closer to the rotor, can i centralise (as officially advised by hope) the pistons to the rotor?
    (i guess that pushing the pistons closer to the rotor, won't provide equal movement of each piston)
     
  13. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    Nothing spectacular with the technique mentioned above.
    The pistons can come out a tiny bit, cause then there is obvious rub.

    Do you think i can get less lever throw than this? This is the best i could .
    Is this considered a low lever throw or high?
    I would like a bit less.

    https://streamable.com/fnk2o
     
  14. Oddjob

    Oddjob Eats Squid

    That's pretty good for Hope's. You're now getting into hardwork territory.

    Are the rotors dead straight? Are the pistons moving out together evenly, if not, you might need to install fresh seals.

    Beyond that you would need brakes that are more on off, like Hope trials brakes, Shimanos or Formulas.



    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
     
  15. pink poodle

    pink poodle Clinically Inane

    So what you're really after is some Hayes hfx-9 brakes.
     
  16. Sethius

    Sethius Crashed out somewhere

    More guides with 0 throw/rub.

    You should be able to get it to that point in the video with Teks advice before using the BPC to fine tune it. Caliper to lever has always worked better for the hope range since they went to the flip flop style levers way back when. I'll see if I post a video of mine.
     
  17. Sethius

    Sethius Crashed out somewhere

  18. hifiandmtb

    hifiandmtb Sphincter beanie

    Nah, SRAM Guides. Leave ‘em in the sun.
     
  19. freeriding

    freeriding Likes Dirt

    Are the rotors dead straight? Are the pistons moving out together evenly, if not, you might need to install fresh seals.

    The rotors aren't dead straight, the seals are excellent cause the brakes (not rotors) are totally new.

    Sethius I also achieved such a lever throw but there was significant rub and the wheel didn't spin freely.

    Maybe I'll try to insert more fluid with a syringe in the caliper bleed port when one finishes the bleed process (the official). I hope it won't damage anything in the long run. What do you think?
     
  20. Sethius

    Sethius Crashed out somewhere

    It's what I do, I close it off under light pressure if I can, I'm using the hope rotor and no drag with plenty of meat on the pads. Granted I spent a while on the bleed when I set them up, but I'll never really have to touch them again. I find it makes a large difference to the 4 pot calipers. (current set back to 2pot)
     

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