Iliotibial band syndrome

rone

Eats Squid
As in the title. Spent winter doing occasional sub 20km offroad rides. Did a 60km road ride 10 days ago after having a bit of a road hibernation over winter. Three days after my right knee swelled up like a balloon and has been like ever since. Anti-inflammatories have no effect whatsoever. I'm back to the Docs tomorrow, but opinions vary between RICEing it to surgery.

Any burners had it? I'm interested in the experiences of fellow sufferers/riders as to recovery times and stretching/exercises as to what to expect and anything I need to alleviate it and prevent further problems. The same knee suffered a partially torn ICL about 7 years ago and the opposing left knee if 1 year down from Arthroscopic surgery.

I'm a bit concerned because I like my knees and need them for riding.
 

moorey

Boom!
My riding mate had it bad. Specially prescribed stretches before and after have made it manageable and got his fat arse riding again.
 

rone

Eats Squid
I suspect that lack of stretching may have been a factor in my current predicament.
 

SlowManiac

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Are you sure it's ITB? Never heard of itb swelling. What are the symptoms.

I've had it, my advice see a physio who'll prescribe exercises to strengthen bio-mechanical weaknesses
 

0psi

Eats Squid
Aahh, the beloved ITB. I had ITB issues last year (tightness) and found stretches using a foam roller helped. But your best bet is to find a good physio.
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
Whatever you have done rone, it reads as still an acute injury - it will be needing time for sure, but dont go writing yourself off as someone with chronically farked knees just yet.

the lesson for others of course is to build into big efforts ;)
 

Norco Maniac

Grooms mobile dogs
i get it on and off, usually in the left leg due to biomechanical issues (weird@rse bone structures that run in my family and a natural spinal fusion) i sometimes get swelling in the knee, probably due to muscle tightness not allowing normal fluid drainage.

stretching the psoas group, piriformis, quads, hammies and using the foam roller for the ITB all help, it's an ongoing process. "Weight Training For Cyclists" has a few good suggestions and the book isn't expensive from the Book Depository in the UK.

i also take a lot of magnesium in the powdered form.
 

Mattydv

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Massages, foam rollers, lying on a cricket/golf ball (pressure being on your ITB) etc all help.

I'd try and avoid regular physio visits if you can, and also add a visit to your GP. I've known more than one physio to be prescribing a certain exercise/recovery program etc., only for the problem not to get any better, yet after a consult with a Dr, have the problem rectified.
 

SlowManiac

Likes Bikes and Dirt
What's a gp going to do? A good physio will give you a range of exercises and stretches to solve the cause of the problem.

If you have significant swelling I would say it is extremely unlikely to be itb. Itb syndrome is an inflammation of the tendon running on the outside of your leg from hip to knee.
 

whatever13

Likes Bikes
Super tight ITB can cause swelling in the knee though just by pulling things out of alignment and causing irritation/damage to other structures which then swell up so maybe that's what he is talking about rather than the ITB itself being inflamed?

I had a lot of knee pain and swelling after every mtb after a period when I was riding loads and stretching ... well ... not loads ... went to the physio, a lot of rest, regular anti-inflammatories and foam roller action sorted it out. For me, the road bike wasn't as bad as the mtb largely I think due to higher cadence and higher seat.
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
What's a gp going to do? A good physio will give you a range of exercises and stretches to solve the cause of the problem.

If you have significant swelling I would say it is extremely unlikely to be itb. Itb syndrome is an inflammation of the tendon running on the outside of your leg from hip to knee.
SM - your second paragraph answers the first - the GP diagnoses, or refers to someone who can, THEN advises on treatment, or refers to someone who can. The significant swelling, screams "injury", and needs proper clinical diagnosis. Then investigations as to cause, then treatment.
 

SlowManiac

Likes Bikes and Dirt
A good physio can also diagnose - in fact as far as sports injuries are concerned about physio probably has more expertise. That's why I reckon skip the gp. Agree swelling means injury, just don't think it's ITB
 

rone

Eats Squid
Off to the GP in the morning, who will be sending me for scans. Will hopefully know more tomorrow. Currently RICEing it - we'll see how it goes.
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
A good physio can also diagnose - in fact as far as sports injuries are concerned about physio probably has more expertise. That's why I reckon skip the gp. Agree swelling means injury, just don't think it's ITB
The disadvantage for the physio is what tests they can order, I,m not even sure they order an X-ray let alone a CT or MRI in order to diagnose. It doesn't matter if the physio can have good idea of what it is, they don't have access to confirming diagnostics so will simply have to send you back to the gp

All the best rone, hope it's minor and short recovery for you
 

SlowManiac

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Of course they can do all of those things. In fact my physio shares an office with one of those medical imaging places.

A gp will prescribe some panadol and tell you to stop riding.
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
Of course they can do all of those things. In fact my physio shares an office with one of those medical imaging places.

A gp will prescribe some panadol and tell you to stop riding.
Well for other readers, the above is not correct, Medicare rebates are heavily restricted for physiotherapy, so you will be paying private/workers comp rates, not bulk billed in most cases
 

rone

Eats Squid
Of course they can do all of those things. In fact my physio shares an office with one of those medical imaging places.

A gp will prescribe some panadol and tell you to stop riding.
Actually she prescribed Voltaren and told me to stop riding.
 

SlowManiac

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Not surprised.

This is the kind of person you want - he works at the same practice as the guy I go to. They actually do bike fit as well there. It's in the sydney CBD


After graduating from the European School of Physiotherapy in Amsterdam, Peter has worked in private practice in the Netherlands and Sydney, as well as orthopaedic and neurological rehabilitation. Peter has a keen interest in sports physiotherapy having worked with London Wasps Rugby Union club and Dutch soccer team S.V. De Meer during his studies. Since graduating, Peter has worked with the Dutch under 20’s basketball team at the European Championships and the prestigious Woollahra Colleagues Rugby Union Club in Sydney. Peter has a keen interest in rehabilitation, lower limb biomechanics, overuse injuries and Bike Fit for cyclists. In his free time Peter competes at club level in cross-country, track and road running and is an enthusiastic recreational cyclist.


Yes it is expensive and not on Medicare. I don't have private health but I consider it money well spent.
 

theMerryPrankster

Likes Dirt
Actually she prescribed Voltaren and told me to stop riding.
Rest and anti-inflammatory treatments are going to be key to recovery. If you're having issues with pain, some GPs will do injections into the muscle that can help alleviate the pain.

If the problem is the ITB (I'm not saying it definitely is), then you could try the following stretches which all work on the ITB.

1. Lie on a bed, or floor on your back. Keeping your hips flat against the ground, bring the affected leg across the other, like a can can dancer. Use your arm to apply downward pressure on the leg for 30 seconds then release.

2. Lie on your side, put a pillow between your legs. Lift the affected leg above the neutral position created by the pillow, and hold for 10 seconds. Rinse and repeat.

3. Stand 30-50cm from a wall, with your healthy leg closest to the wall. Cross your sore leg in front of the bad side, and lock your ankles together. Place your hand on the same side as the sore leg above your head against the wall, and push your hips away from the wall
 

cleeshoy

Eats Squid
As in the title. Spent winter doing occasional sub 20km offroad rides. Did a 60km road ride 10 days ago after having a bit of a road hibernation over winter. Three days after my right knee swelled up like a balloon and has been like ever since. .
Could bike setup be a factor also?
 
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