Lets talk about... Private Health Insurance.

Private VS Public Health Insurance

  • Public Health Sytem all the way!

    Votes: 10 16.9%
  • i DO have Private Health Insurance

    Votes: 45 76.3%
  • i am thinking about getting Private Health Insurance

    Votes: 3 5.1%
  • I can't afford Private Health Insurance

    Votes: 2 3.4%

  • Total voters
    59

skivi

Likes Dirt
i found out recently after a trip to the dentist to confirm that yes my wisdom teeth will soon have to come out, that my mother had cancelled our family's private health insurance soon after buying her new luxury European car late last year. I'm 21 and fit as a fiddle with no major likely-hood of inheriting any horrible illness any time soon but I've heard my fair share of horror story's regarding the public health system so I'm in the market for my own Private Health Insurance and I'm not sure where to start....



if you'd like to discuss the Private VS Public Heath systems, Insurance company's, previous experiences, cover fine print or any such related topics this is the place to do it.



if you currently have Private Health Insurance let us know the following:

Code:
[B]Insurer:[/B]
[B]Cover Type:[/B]
[B]Price:[/B]
[B]Link:[/B]
[B]Review:[/B]

-Nick
 

Nerf Herder

Wheel size expert
If the only injuries / illnesses you are likely to receive are near death, and or you don't mind waiting then Public Health Care is for you.

My father inlaw has been forking out for private health for god knows how long (say 25 years prolly more) ... never used it ... until 10 weeks ago ... x2 $20K ops plus $500 per visit once a fortnight to the cardiologist ... as he puts it ... "to take my Blood pressure".

I currently work for a health company ... although in the investment side of things ... as much of a rort that it is ... I'd rather have it then not.
 

RCOH

Eats Squid
Insurer: HCF
Cover Type: Hospital,Dental. Ambo (Family package?)
Price: approx $30 per fortnight
Link: don't know sorry
Review: We mainly got private health care because of the kids. They were born premature and there was a chance of ongoing health problems. That being said, there really were none, and anything that did happen the public system took care of it very promptly & profesionally. We do use the dental quite often as my gf has bad teeth and needs regular check ups, and we want to instill regular dentist visits as normal for the boys, so it is nice we don't have to pay for dental. I personally have good teeth and have never actually made a claim on my private health insurance.

Edit: I am a big fan of the public system and believe they do a fantastic job despite funding cuts and being constantly underresourced.
 

wombat

Lives in a hole
I'm kind of in the same boat as Skivi; don't have it at the moment, but very strongly considering it. I guess my big drivers are ambulance cover (I saw the cost for a trip recently and it was, well...scary) and maybe dental, as it might encourage me to actually go to the dentist. I also have one rubbish eye actually, and although glasses aren't going to help my cause at this point, maybe it's something I should consider too.

I'll be watching this one with some interest.
 

Arete

Likes Dirt
Insurer: MBF
Cover Type: Hospital, basic extras, single. Started it at age 21, now 27.
Price: $31 a month
Link: google MBF
Review: Got it as I need glasses contact lenses, and in combination with being able to keep my dentist visits up to date, I break fairly even and have hospital cover just in case. [/QUOTE]

Insurer: DAN
Cover Type: Hyperbaric treatment, Search and rescue operations, annual dive medical exam.
Price: $150 p.a.
Link: google Diver's Alert Network
Review: A must for anyone into tech diving. [/QUOTE]
 

rhysrhysbaby

Eats Squid
Insurer: Latrobe Health Services
Cover Type: Hospital
Price: $200 a quarter
Link: on the google.
Review: I only paid the first bill a month or so ago so I cant confirm how good the service is.
My mum works for Latrobe Health and I've always had health insurance, but as she gets a staff discount have always been under her policy. When I turned 25 I came off her policy and had to sort out my own. Mum organised it all for me, and since I'm relatively healthy i just got hospital cover (I purchased ambulance cover seperately)
Other than the push from my mum, I got private hospital cover just incase I need to get a new knee or something silly like that. I've had two friends wreck themselves riding bmx over the last 16 or so months and after a heap of stuffing around were put on the public waiting lists for their operations. I'd rather cough up some cash so that if I do ever need an operation, it will happen alot quicker than it would through the public system.
If I didnt have health insurance, it would also cost me an extra $500 in tax, so I'd rather see this money go towards something that may actually benefit me.


Even if you dont have private health insurance, PLEASE GET AMBULANCE COVER!!!!!!
There are too many stories of people getting stung with ridiculous bills for getting ambulance rides without cover.
 

W2ttsy

Likes Dirt
Insurer: Medibank
Cover Type: Platinum
Price: n/a
Link: unavailable
Review: This is staff cover that my mum has because she works for Medibank. Its equivalent to their top tier cover, but at a staff rate and a few other things.

Covers all things, although i only use dental and optical.

The only time i needed it as a result of an injury was to cover the shit ton of osteopathy appointments i had after i crashed one time and buggered up my back.
 

frostbite

Likes Dirt
When I lived in Aus I had ambulance cover only. Figured being young and indestructible I'd be fine, plus I'd taken a few ambulance rides under my parents cover previously and when I wasnt covered by that any longer got my own.

In the US now I have health insurance through work. Costs me about $30 a fortnight and the company pays the rest (dont remember how much but its a lot), and dental ($4 a month and the company pays $8 remainder) which covers me up to 1500$. Since I need to get my wisdom teeth out this is going to come in useful!
 

scblack

Leucocholic
Insurer: NIB
Cover type: Family Full cover plus extras like Optical
Price: $235 per month
Review: I am only on private cover because if I did not have it, I would be paying MORE in income taxes as I am over 30years. Makes it a no-brainer to have it. I have two toddlers also, so they may be expensive - who knows?
 

TonyG

Likes Dirt
Insurer - NIB
Cover - Top family cover with all the trimmings.
Cost - No idea, probably pretty expensive though.
Review : I've always had at least basic private cover since leaving school. Mainly as I've always played full contact sports and have spent many a night in hospital. When I got married we upped our cover to the max, with kids planned you just can't put yourself in a position where you can't afford to get something done. We just had our daughter earlier this month and it was through emergency surgery. Even with top cover we have still had to shell-out a couple of thousands on top, so beware they don't cover everything. It's usually a % of the costs covered. Still worth it in my opinion, I've heard so many horror stories from public hospitals it isn't worth the risk. Also we had our own room for a week that I would have been happy with from a resort, and the best doctors and mid-wives I think you could get. We left hospital very satisfied with the decision we made on private cover.
 

cam-o

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Insurer: NIB
Review: I am only on private cover because if I did not have it, I would be paying MORE in income taxes as I am over 30years. Makes it a no-brainer to have it. I have two toddlers also, so they may be expensive - who knows?
What he said - except 1 toddler and a teen with a tendency to do stupid things :p

I'm on a corporate deal that offers ridiculous benefits so I'm keeping it - when we claim the NIB office staff always comment on how good our cover is, better than the staff plan apparently.
 

brisneyland

Likes Dirt
My personal take on it is, that if you have something seriously wrong with you public health is fine, and in fact I'd almost prefer to be treated for something life threatening in a public hospital. For all the other stuff, elective surgery etc, private health cover is useful I guess.

I don't have it. It will soon become a financial burden not to have it though, so I will start looking into it soon.
 

mittagongmtb

Likes Dirt
GMHBA
Family
$162 pm
[FONT=&quot]Gold Hospital[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]This fact sheet is to be read in conjunction with the 2009 Member Guide. This information is important and should be retained.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Our Gold Hospital cover provides you with real peace of mind and allows you to choose your doctor. Gold Hospital is available to everybody including singles, single parents, couples and families. You’ll be covered for a wide range of hospital services (subject to bed availability and certification by a medical practitioner for the need of acute care after 35 days).[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]What’s covered?[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Gold Hospital (GH0) provides cover* at participating private hospitals for:[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Accommodation - shared and private room (where available)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Theatre [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Delivery suite[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Intensive and coronary care[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Same day treatment[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Surgically implanted prostheses (Government prescribed benefits)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Medical gap [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]• Other agreed charges[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Excess options[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]No excess applies for child dependants under 21 on GMHBA’s Gold family hospital covers. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Gold Hospital cover is available with either: [/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]Level 0 nil excess (GH0) or[/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]Progressively lower premiums in return for admission excesses of:[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]-[/FONT][FONT=&quot]Level 1 $250 (GH1)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]-[/FONT][FONT=&quot]Level 2 $500 (GH2)[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Excess options table[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Level 0 [/FONT][FONT=&quot]nil excess[/FONT][FONT=&quot] (GH0)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Level 1 [/FONT][FONT=&quot]excess[/FONT][FONT=&quot] (GH1)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]GH2 [/FONT][FONT=&quot]excess[/FONT][FONT=&quot] (GH2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Admission excess (private hospital – overnight)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]nil[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$250[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$500[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Admission excess (public hospital or day stay)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]nil[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$125[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$250[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum annual excess – per person[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]nil[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$250[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$500[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum annual excess – singles[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]nil[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$250[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$500[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum annual excess – families[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]nil[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$500[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]$1,000[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Public hospitals[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]You’ll also be covered* for hospital accommodation costs when you are admitted to a private or shared room (subject to bed availability) as a private patient in a public hospital.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Other private hospitals[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fixed benefits are payable in non participating private hospitals (see 2009 Member Guide for more details). [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]*Limited benefits may apply to cosmetic surgery and high cost drugs. Drugs purchased outside of the hospital are not included.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Healthy Start Benefit[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Gold Hospital cover provides an additional benefit of up to $500 per childbirth admission to help cover the obstetrics medical gap. For further details see the 2009 Member Guide.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Waiting periods[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Waiting periods exist to protect members from claims made by those who join the fund or increase their level of cover because they have a condition or illness that may require treatment.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Waiting periods will apply to:[/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]New memberships (previously uninsured).[/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]Additions to a membership (unless the addition/s has already served all waiting periods with GMHBA or another fund) except newborns, adopted and permanent foster children where the family membership has been in existence for at least 2 months. [/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]Existing GMHBA memberships, and transfers to GMHBA from another fund where the level of cover and/or benefit entitlement is upgraded or increased and/or where the waiting periods have not been completed.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Pre-existing condition waiting periods[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]A special waiting period applies to new members of hospital tables who have pre-existing conditions. The waiting period also applies to existing members who have recently upgraded their level of hospital cover. If the illness or condition is considered pre-existing:[/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]new members must wait 12 months for any hospital benefits[/FONT]
·[FONT=&quot]members transferring/upgrading to a higher hospital cover must wait 12 months to get the higher hospital benefits.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Existing members with at least 12 months membership in total across their old and new cover are entitled to the lower benefits on their old cover.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Bronze Extras (BE)[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]This fact sheet is to be read in conjunction with the 2009 Member Guide. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]This information is important and should be retained.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Important note: The extras tables must be read along with the footnotes below.
[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]All extras services must be provided by practitioners in private practice who are appropriately registered with recognised bodies approved by GMHBA. We recommend you call 1300 4 GMHBA (46422) or visit a branch for a benefit estimate before commencing treatment to confirm the benefit payable.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Extras Services - [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Please refer to the footnotes following this table. (Victoria)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Waiting Periods[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Benefit[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]DENTAL[/FONT]



[FONT=&quot]MAJOR DENTAL [/FONT][FONT=&quot](see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Orthodontic [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefits per calendar year Benefits example: Fixed appliance treatment – upper and lower jaw treatment by a registered specialist. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]75% up to $300 per year [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefit per course of treatment[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$900[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Lifetime benefit limit[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$1,050[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Dentures (see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]New full upper and lower dentures per 2 years[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$420[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Combined crown and bridgework (see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$450[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Indirect restorations (see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person/single membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$350[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per family membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$700[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Implants (see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$400[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]GENERAL DENTAL [/FONT][FONT=&quot](% of GMHBA schedule fee. For more information see general dental note on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]a) Diagnostic services[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]70%[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]b) Preventative services e.g. periodic examination 2 per 12 mth period, removal of plaque 3 per 12 mth period[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Up to $200 per person[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]c) Simple extractions (not including surgical extractions of wisdom teeth)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]70%[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]d)Restorative services(limited benefits apply to precious restorations)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]70%[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]ANNUAL DENTAL LIMIT[/FONT][FONT=&quot] (see important note for dental on page 2)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$1,000[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Fluoride dietary supplement1[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Benefit of up to[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]85%[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$45[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Detailed Fact Sheet Bronze Extras (Be) [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Important note for Dental:[/FONT][FONT=&quot] The benefits shown are the annual limits for each type of dental service. There are further sub limits within some of these dental services e.g. the individual benefit for one crown on Bronze Extras (BE) is $225. Therefore, please call 1300 4 GMHBA (46422) or visit a branch for a benefit estimate before treatment to confirm the benefit payable. The annual limit per person/single membership includes combined benefits for general dental and major dental.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]For new memberships[/FONT][FONT=&quot] (no previous extras cover) or where 12 months continuous dental cover has not been in existence, all dental benefits will be limited to $200 per person/single membership and $400 per family membership during the first 12 months of membership with GMHBA.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]General Dental –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] The benefits listed are examples of dental benefits (% of GMHBA schedule fee).[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]For services other than dental, benefits for 1 initial consultation per therapy type are available each calendar year.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]There are a range of dental procedures that cannot be claimed when provided on the same day e.g. a filling on a tooth that has been removed. There are also limits on the number of dental procedures you can have e.g. periodic examinations are limited to 2 per 12 month period. Dental benefits for some procedures cannot be paid unless tooth identifications (ID) are supplied by the provider.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Extras footnotes[/FONT]



[FONT=&quot]1. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Fluoride dietary supplement - [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Benefits are only payable towards the cost of dietary fluoride supplements (tablet or liquid form) dispensed by a chemist or dentist in private practice.[/FONT]




[FONT=&quot]Myotherapy [/FONT][FONT=&quot]see Physiotherapy/ Myotherapy / Hydrotherapy[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Occupational therapy[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Initial visit[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$31[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2-10 subsequent visits[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$21[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Further visits[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$17[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person/single membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$350[/FONT][FONT=&quot]2[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per family membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$600[/FONT][FONT=&quot]2[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Optical[/FONT][FONT=&quot]3[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]6 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Prescription spectacles, contact lenses and frames – benefit of up to [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]80%[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$170[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Orthopaedic appliances[/FONT][FONT=&quot]4[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Benefit of up to[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]80%[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefit per item[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$115[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Limit per person every 3 years[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]$400[/FONT][FONT=&quot] 5[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Orthopaedic appliance repairs[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$40[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Pharmacy – private script[/FONT][FONT=&quot] 6[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Members pay the first maximum PBS contribution then the following benefit is paid towards the balance.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$40[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person/single membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$250[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per family membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$400[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Physiotherapy / Myotherapy / [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Hydrotherapy[/FONT][FONT=&quot] 7[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Initial visit[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$31[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2-10 subsequent visits[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$21[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Further visits[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$17[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Class attendance[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$10[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per person/single membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$350 8[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Annual limit per family membership each calendar year[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$600 8[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]Prostheses (non surgical)[/FONT][FONT=&quot] 9[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]12 mths[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Benefit of up to[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]80%[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefit per item[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$300[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Maximum benefit per person every 3 years[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]$400[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]
[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]2. Occupational therapy –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] The annual limit of $350 per person/single membership and $600 per family membership each calendar year includes combined benefits for physiotherapy, myotherapy, occupational therapy and hydrotherapy.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]3. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Optical – [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Non prescription sunglasses and repairs are excluded.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]4. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Orthopaedic appliances (GMHBA approved) – [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Must be custom made or approved by GMHBA. A doctor’s letter recommending the appliance must accompany each claim for benefits. Orthopaedic appliances attract benefits where the application of which has resulted from, and is required immediately following the injury or surgery to the injury necessitating the appliance, for purposes other than or additional to support. For an appliance to be custom made, a plaster cast or mould must be taken. Customising, heat moulding, trimming or adjusting an existing ‘off the shelf’ appliance does not involve this process and therefore does not constitute a custom made appliance. There are some conditions, therefore we recommend you call 1300 4 GMHBA (46422) or visit a branch for a benefit estimate to confirm the benefit payable.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]5. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Orthopaedic appliances (GMHBA approved) –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] The limit of $400 per person is available every 3 years for orthopaedic appliances.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]6. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Pharmacy –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Private Script Benefits are only payable towards the cost of prescription pharmaceuticals dispensed via a provider in private practice. Benefits are not payable towards the cost of contraceptives or NHS (PBS) prescriptions, food supplements, natural remedies (including modifast/optifast), over the counter items purchased with or without a prescription and pharmaceuticals purchased overseas and not listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]7.[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Physiotherapy/Myotherapy/Hydrotherapy –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] For physiotherapy and hydrotherapy only, class attendance is limited to $240 per person each calendar year and this limit is included within your annual limit. Benefits will only be paid for 1 consultation and/or treatment type per day regardless of the provider within the group of physiotherapy, myotherapy and if eligible, remedial massage.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]8. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Physiotherapy/Myotherapy/Hydrotherapy –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] The annual limit of $350 per person/single membership and $600 per family membership each calendar year includes combined benefits for physiotherapy, myotherapy, occupational therapy and hydrotherapy.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]9. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Prostheses (non surgical) –[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Prostheses include a range of approved non-surgically implanted prostheses (e.g. wigs). A doctor’s letter of recommendation must accompany each claim for benefits. We recommend you contact us on 1300 4 GMHBA (46422) or visit a branch for a benefit estimate to confirm the benefit payable.[/FONT]
 

Christo

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I currently work for a health company ... although in the investment side of things ... as much of a rort that it is ... I'd rather have it then not.
Hey, I suspect we're both working for the same mob.

On topic, I don't have private health insurance, even though I work for a health co. Thought about packaging it on my salary but to get the kind of family cover we'd actually use, we thought the risk/reward payoff wasn't enough - especially on a single income. Also, the basic levels of cover through most insurers are quite low, maternity cover is not really worth it - based purely on our one experience with the public system vs. our friends who went private.

That said, once the mortgage is under control, we will probably sign up.
 

scblack

Leucocholic
Hey, I suspect we're both working for the same mob.

On topic, I don't have private health insurance, even though I work for a health co. Thought about packaging it on my salary but to get the kind of family cover we'd actually use, we thought the risk/reward payoff wasn't enough - especially on a single income. Also, the basic levels of cover through most insurers are quite low, maternity cover is not really worth it - based purely on our one experience with the public system vs. our friends who went private.

That said, once the mortgage is under control, we will probably sign up.
I found maternity cover was well worth it. Overall for each birth of my two girls it cost us out of pocket roughly $1,000. That was for caesar deliveries for both, private room in Westmead Private hospital. It was all quite good. Choice of doctors, private room, good hospital, essentially emergency surgery, I found it well worth it.

Its Insurance, I get very little back on the monthly premium, but if one of us requires surgery or has a lengthy illness, it is then very worthwhile.

Do you pay for car insurance? Your risk/reward payoff analysis must mean you don't.:cool: Or do you crash your car each year to get value from it?
 

TonyG

Likes Dirt
It's an interesting point that Christo brings up though. Everyone has a different risk appetite, and at some point you have to ask yourself when is the insurance premiums crossing over to be uneconomical for your needs. This does go for cars insurance too. If you bought a 2nd hand car for $5k, then really you'd only want 3rd party personal and property, not the full comprehensive?? I guess it's all relative to what you want from it.
Personally my risk appetite revolves around how easy it is to do, because I'm incredibly lazy with this sort of administration type stuff. So I just dump it all on my wife to do. Pretty much this is how I'd like to do everything. I'm trying to train up some staff here to do my job and then all I do it point to things and they happen! Really it's a great idea until they then work out I'm not needed. Although someone has to do the pointing!
 

scblack

Leucocholic
I'm trying to train up some staff here to do my job and then all I do it point to things and they happen! Really it's a great idea until they then work out I'm not needed. Although someone has to do the pointing!
Or until there is a f**k-up!
 

Beej1

Senior Member
Grave Dig.

After recently using my private health insurance for surgery (for the first time in 20 years of paying premiums), I was quite shocked to discover how little they covered. Or ... more on-point, how little the MBS amount is for arthroscopic shoulder repairs, and/or how far over that amount any surgeon worth their weight potentially charges for said surgery, and how little the insurance company contributes to the underlying MBS amount (about 20%).

I guess footballer's clubs pay the huge amounts without batting much of an eyelid (guy I used does AFL players most of the year).

Question: Has anyone ever used one of their insurer's 'No Gap' surgeons for a procedure, and has it gone well? I've read a number of stories of people going through the public system and ending up no better, or even worse. I'm sure there are heaps of stories where it goes fine which are un-reported, but I personally wasn't interested in taking the risk. I'm happy to cop the fee I paid, but I'm just thinking about the future in case I find myself in this position again.

Or, as I've read suggested elsewhere, is the best thing to do immediately following a MTB crash is to go to a shopping mall and slip on a grape and fall on the injured body part again?
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
Even if you want to pay cash because you are uninsured, plenty of surgeons won't entertain you anyway. Not sure if it's hospital policies or what, but no insurance means no deal often.

In public, you need to know a little about how the system works. I've had 3 injuries that required surgery, one was a scaphoid and after the quote, I decided against surgery. The second and third was a clavicle, the type of fracture meant public would do it, and for good measure I had one of the best trauma surgeons around so went with it publicly. If the surgeon wasn't quite so good I would have gone private. I am lucky though and have good contacts to know whose who in the zoo
 

Haakon

veni, vidi, volanti
Do not get me started on this fucking rort... My out of pockets for my recent surgery are close to $7K - Medicare still covered more than those greedy scumsucking fucktards at my health insurance premium generating outfit.

Got hit with an unexpected $2.2K for the hospital because they found a loophole to not cover hospital fees for accidents because the root cause accident was from a few years back.

Fucking conservative governments need a kick in the head on this shit, health is the poster boy for shit that should not be privatised.... Its a public service.
 
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