Metallic Vs Organic Pads

Shredden

Knows his goats
Cheers for the advice fellas, I will look into the Uberbike ones when the OEM ones are up for replacement.

Seems like close to a 50/50 split on organic v. metallic. Might flip a coin...
 

Scotty675

Likes Dirt
Pfft. Wear out the resin til it’s the metal backing
I've been doing it all wrong, such a newbie mistake. Had troubles cooking pads when contaminated, I've been using vegetable oil and the results haven't been great, maybe coconut oil is the go
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
Cheers for the advice fellas, I will look into the Uberbike ones when the OEM ones are up for replacement.

Seems like close to a 50/50 split on organic v. metallic. Might flip a coin...
I think the Uberbike racematrix are some sort of fancy semi-metallic, similar to the Trickstuff Power pads. They don't last as long as sintered but they have more bite.

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 

Paulie_AU

Likes Dirt
Metal.

Last week threw some resin in my bike and have been thinking they are ok (they work but lack brutal reserve braking)...... then rode the other bike with metal yesterday and wayyyyyy better. Need to order metal now. BTW both bikes running 4 pot and the metal has 203/180 vs the resin running 203/203 rotors.

I can see how the resin feel like they have more modulation but I can control my fingers and like to have reserve power for when shit gets nasty.
 

The Duckmeister

Eats Squid
I can see how the resin feel like they have more modulation.....
Thing is that they don't.. Resin bite harder, which is great when you want short, hard dabs of brake, but the range of useful power is less than metal. If you try to modulate the brake for any moderately extended period, feathering/low load substantially increases the heat buildup within the pads, they melt, and glaze, and you lose a huge proportion of their power. Extended hard braking will make them a tad less prone to glazing, you'll just rip them to shreds very quickly.

Metal pads, being harder for a start, don't bite as hard initially, which can make them feel dead when you do only want the occasional quick dab, especially (as I mentioned previously) in cold conditions, but once warmed up the gentler bite plus higher heat tolerance under load result in vastly superior modulation and outright stopping power. Really though, if you're riding hard enough to need four-pot calipers, resin pads won't be up to the task; metal will be your better bet..
 

Shredden

Knows his goats
I've just ordered the M8120 brakes with Metal Ice-Tec pads and 203mm RT66 rotors.

Hopefully have the powah I'm looking for.
 

mooboyj

Likes Dirt
Metal for the front, resin at the back.

FWIW I run metallic on the Bronson and resin on the Cannondale hardtail. Metallic for heavier repeated braking but resin are fine.
I live in Tassie and its steep. My bikes all had sintered front and back bar one, and that bike I have resin front and now sintered back as I drag the ass on that bike a lot. I felt a loss of power in the back with resins on my second last ride as I hit some of the DH tracks. I switched to sintered in the back (grabbed a pair locally) and will probably switch the front to sintered as well.

I ran sintered in Perth, but that was due to the sand and dust. Wear on most things was severe I found.
 

Paulie_AU

Likes Dirt
Thing is that they don't.. Resin bite harder, which is great when you want short, hard dabs of brake, but the range of useful power is less than metal. If you try to modulate the brake for any moderately extended period, feathering/low load substantially increases the heat buildup within the pads, they melt, and glaze, and you lose a huge proportion of their power. Extended hard braking will make them a tad less prone to glazing, you'll just rip them to shreds very quickly.

Metal pads, being harder for a start, don't bite as hard initially, which can make them feel dead when you do only want the occasional quick dab, especially (as I mentioned previously) in cold conditions, but once warmed up the gentler bite plus higher heat tolerance under load result in vastly superior modulation and outright stopping power. Really though, if you're riding hard enough to need four-pot calipers, resin pads won't be up to the task; metal will be your better bet..
I concur.

Interestingly the only time I have had a brake fade in the last few years was on the rear on a DH track on a trail bike. It was resin with a 180 rotor. I fixed it next run by staying off the brakes.
 

link1896

Wheel size expert
Resin for xc, metal for DH. Somewhere in between you need to transition.

Yes, I’ve run brakes with resin in one side of the caliper, metal on the other. Works a treat, but wear is uneven.
 
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