Rockshox XC 32 TK forks - any one used /reviewed

jumpers

Likes Dirt
Wondering if anyone has used these forks and what they think of them (have read mtbr reviews)

Reason - i have a 2008 kona stuff (i love this bike) with marzocci dj forks (100mm 9mm drop outs). I want to turn the bike into general xc machine (i only ride xc for fun etc - got a reign for all mtn stuff) and am thinking replacing the dj with these forks - only to be riden for xc style rides.

TBSM have them for good price - looking any advice before i purchase ..hopefully!

Just looking something bit more plusher for small bumps than the dj forks
 
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silentbutdeadly

Eats Squid
Wondering if anyone has used these forks and what they think of them (have read mtbr reviews)

Reason - i have a 2008 kona stuff (i love this bike) with marzocci dj forks (100mm 9mm drop outs). I want to turn the bike into general xc machine (i only ride xc for fun etc - got a reign for all mtn stuff) and am thinking replacing the dj with these forks - only to be riden for xc style rides.

TBSM have them for good price - looking any advice before i purchase ..hopefully!
They are good basic entry level coil sprung forks - the latest version of the Dart. Simple. Not outstanding. If looked after they'll last a long time. Spend the extra 20 bucks for the remote lockout.

Though for the same money...don't discount the Pro Carbon rigid fork that TBSM have. Big weight saving over the RS fork - 850 grams plays 2385 grams. And that potentially adds up to some seriously sharp XC handling with some nice carbon compliance built in.
 

jumpers

Likes Dirt
They are good basic entry level coil sprung forks - the latest version of the Dart. Simple. Not outstanding. If looked after they'll last a long time. Spend the extra 20 bucks for the remote lockout.

Though for the same money...don't discount the Pro Carbon rigid fork that TBSM have. Big weight saving over the RS fork - 850 grams plays 2385 grams. And that potentially adds up to some seriously sharp XC handling with some nice carbon compliance built in.
Thanks - not looking for anything outstanding, just simple and reliable. I clean stanchions after each ride.

I know what you mean about the weight - but the tracks i will ride are not smooth at all, wouldnt want rigid as bit harsh as is with dj's on. Also i really only ride xc as fitness ride for hour or so, so doesnt have to have fast xc style handling.

Thanks for reply.

BTW - your username cracks me up every time:heh:
 

silentbutdeadly

Eats Squid
Thanks - not looking for anything outstanding, just simple and reliable. I clean stanchions after each ride.

I know what you mean about the weight - but the tracks i will ride are not smooth at all, wouldnt want rigid as bit harsh as is with dj's on. Also i really only ride xc as fitness ride for hour or so, so doesnt have to have fast xc style handling.

You shouldn't judge all rigid forks based on DJ forks. DJ forks are supposed to be rigid. The carbon forks I pointed out will actually be quite compliant and will soak up quite a lot of the chatter - imagine a very short travel fork with quick rebound. Agree it's not for everyone but it is truly not something to discounted out of hand. Much of my riding is like yours given your description and I know that rigid is well doable...

I am nothing like my user name...
 

pharmaboy

Eats Squid
i've got these forks on a 29er (new ones are on the way) - they are somewhat heavy, but usual coil feel - dont seem to be flexy at all, but the first 10 or 15mm of the stroke seems a bit notchy, especially on road - dont notice it on trail, but climbing on a road its sort of like a topping out effect.
 

C0na

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Hey mate i have a set of Rock Shox Recon Silver TK Forks.
Great fork, not the lightest fork out there but the performance is great. They have really nice feel to them, nice and plush
They have a fair few good features too
Rebound, Preload, Lockout...
Not really trying to plug a sale here but I happen to have a near new set for sale too..
I would be keeping them.. if i had room for anoher bike :(
Here are some details of them:
http://www.totalcycling.com/a-z/forks_mtb/FK_RECON.html
PM me if you are interested..
 
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guitar1234

Likes Dirt
I tested a pair of these on the front of an Avanti Agressor at work. I was honestly surprised at how plush they were for a low-end fork, so nice and regulated rather then the almost pogo-stick action of Darts
 

jumpers

Likes Dirt
Thanks for the replies, kinda confirmed what i thought - basic fork but works ok. As its for my muck around fitness bike it may be the go...

pm'd fred the sped re recons.

Sussed the maniotus - look good but i dont want give money to o/s, rather spend bit more and support tbsm or someone local with forks for sale
 

cobba

Likes Dirt
pm'd fred the sped re recons.

Sussed the maniotus - look good but i dont want give money to o/s, rather spend bit more and support tbsm or someone local with forks for sale
Where did 'fred the sped2' buy the Recon from ?

If 'fred the sped2' bought the fork from overseas and you buy the fork off him, you're basically buying the fork from overseas but in a less direct route.
 

Pebble

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I did a little bit of reading recently (hoping to possibly purchase something like the GT Avalanche 1.0 later this year which comes with XC30's), from what I gather the XC32 would be a bit like the old Toras.

I've read good things about some of the Manitou forks as well, but really at your budget it's probably much of a muchness anyway.

Other thing to consider is changing the spring for a softer one if your DJ fork is a coil fork? When I had a DJ bike I sold the Argyle off it without even giving it a good go and replaced it with a Pike454 Air fork. Would have probably been better off just getting a softer spring for the Argyle, I reckon it would have been plusher (for a lighter kind of rider) although the Pike was probably a reasonable amount lighter, and the old Tora I had was even lighter again.
 
Hey mate I see you have had a plethra of replies but I thought Id throw in my 2 cents. I've been running the 32s on my merida and as you say they are simple and reliable with good rebound and feel. Big step up from your old forks
 

ninjananna

Likes Dirt
I'll jump on the end here too - I gave a little thought to these when I bought my Recon Silver TK 100s (coil).

Whilst I didn't buy the XC32 I still bought the coil based Recons, I bought the coil over the solo air for reliability as I figured a coil is never going to leave you stranded.

What I failed to take into consideration (being a total newb) was my weight - I'm about 88kg in my riding gear and the standard spring (medium - red) wasn't heavy enough for me. I changed the spring for a firm - blue but it added another $44 + international freight (after waiting 12 weeks for Monza to not bring it in).

Interestingly the red needed full preload and used absolutely all travel - the blue on the other hand has the preload backed all the way off and I'm yet to see anymore than about 80mm travel used (though the rides I've done since changing the spring have been very very sedate)

Had I gone with the solo air I could have just added more air to get the sag right and use full travel.

I guess what I'm saying is take into account the cost and availability of a different spring if you're not 70-85kg
 

The Duckmeister

Has stumpy thumbs, Speciaized are so weird
What kind of sag are you getting when you sit on the bike? If the fork hasn't got a rubber o-ring around one of the stanchions, wrap a cable tie around (not too tightly, just snug enough so it'll stay in position)- that'll be your sighting guide. Sit on the bike in full riding kit, and in position. You may need a helper to hold you steady, or just lightly lean against a wall. Push the cable-tie/o-ring down to the dirt seal, then as gently as possible hop off the bike. There should now be a gap under the sighting guide of around 15-20mm. For longer or shorter travel forks the exact distance will vary, but it should still be in that 15-20% range.

80% of travel used doesn't sound to be too stiff if you're not pushing the bike all that hard.

Side note: Recon/Tora Coil forks can be upgraded with an air-spring conversion kit. From memory it's about $120-150. Not sure if it's compatible with Dart/XC series models though.
 

cobba

Likes Dirt
I wouldn't even think about upgrading a Rockshox XC coil to a air spring, the fork will end up being a money pit.

Rockshox XC models have non replaceable bushings in the legs, when the non replaceable bushings wear the whole lower leg assembly will need replacing.

A new lower leg assembly for the XC models might cost around $150 if you can find anyone that sells them, I've only seen one online shop that list new legs for these forks and they have them as being 'Out of Stock' and on 'Backorder'.

If you wanted to upgrade worn legs with non replaceable bushings to a new leg assembly with replaceable bushings you'd probably be looking at $200+

With a fork that has replaceable bushings, you can get new bushings for about $10 from CRC.
 
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waldog

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I did a little bit of reading recently (hoping to possibly purchase something like the GT Avalanche 1.0 later this year which comes with XC30's), from what I gather the XC32 would be a bit like the old Toras.

I've read good things about some of the Manitou forks as well, but really at your budget it's probably much of a muchness anyway.

Other thing to consider is changing the spring for a softer one if your DJ fork is a coil fork? When I had a DJ bike I sold the Argyle off it without even giving it a good go and replaced it with a Pike454 Air fork. Would have probably been better off just getting a softer spring for the Argyle, I reckon it would have been plusher (for a lighter kind of rider) although the Pike was probably a reasonable amount lighter, and the old Tora I had was even lighter again.
.... and as a side note, your Pike is still going as strong as ever.

This thread is so old, i'd like to think that the OP has got this sorted by now. If not, go used, and a used Pike at that.
 

Pebble

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Yeah this thread is pretty old, what did you get OP?

My new bike has a Dart 2 on it (nice carbon HT that I brought new this year but it was on older model so older style forks...2010 I think), really it's a bit of a letdown purely because the Dart is such a heavy fork, functionally it's quite good for the riding I do (mostly riding to work, not much offroad these days unfortunately). to looks
I sold everything up and stopped riding for a while. So it's just good to have a nice HT again now, but taking all my might to not want to upgrade the fork. Well Husband said deal was if I got a new bike I wasn't allowed to upgrade stuff :( ....but I'll just wait a year and then I'm sure I can wrangle something :)

I hear the TK32 is meant to be a bit like the old Tora, which I'd be happy with but I must say I'd be more inclined to look at some of the Manitous actually.
I had rigid DJ forks for a bit before I sold my STP, and I can't say I was that much of a fan of rigid, although as pointed out carbon might be a bit different. However personally I think I'd only go that way if I really wanted the weight savings more than anything.
 
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