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Thread: New bike, steerer too short.

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    Senior Member GrubNut's Avatar
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    Default New bike, steerer too short.

    Ok I have a bit of a tricky situation. I recently bought a new bike and when I picked it up I found that the steerer had been cut so short that no spacers can be fitted. Also the fork appeared to be a different one to the one on the bike at the time I paid for it (different colour stickers). The stem only has 40mm of stack.

    I only noticed after leaving the shop. I thought it was a bit odd that it was cut like that, but the bike felt ok at first. Now after riding it I'd like to raise the bars by 10 or 15mm, and at least want to have the option of adjusting the height.

    It's a bit tricky because now that I have ridden the bike I guess I cannot return the fork. Isn't it quite odd to build a new bike without having a little bit of adjustment? I mean, I am even quite limited in my choice of stems at (max 40mm height). I can always try riser bars but it is a rather expensive way to experiment with bar height. I really feel that this was a mistake by the shop to supply a bike with no adjustment at all.

    This is an 8.5K bike.

    Opinions?
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Big JD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrubNut View Post
    Ok I have a bit of a tricky situation. I recently bought a new bike and when I picked it up I found that the steerer had been cut so short that no spacers can be fitted. Also the fork appeared to be a different one to the one on the bike at the time I paid for it (different colour stickers). The stem only has 40mm of stack.

    I only noticed after leaving the shop. I thought it was a bit odd that it was cut like that, but the bike felt ok at first. Now after riding it I'd like to raise the bars by 10 or 15mm, and at least want to have the option of adjusting the height.

    It's a bit tricky because now that I have ridden the bike I guess I cannot return the fork. Isn't it quite odd to build a new bike without having a little bit of adjustment? I mean, I am even quite limited in my choice of stems at (max 40mm height). I can always try riser bars but it is a rather expensive way to experiment with bar height. I really feel that this was a mistake by the shop to supply a bike with no adjustment at all.

    This is an 8.5K bike.

    Opinions?
    In 6.4 and need to get my front end up!!!
    You should certainly take to the bike shop that you brought it from. If they are selling $8 grand bikes then they would certainly have many more build in the pipeline- could swap your fork for a longer one.
    I recently brought a fork that I knew was too short and got Jon @ Gripsport's to lengthen it for me. His work is great and super solid. Cost $180 from memory.
    Your right to try riser stem and bars but for some reason it always feelings slightly weird at first.
    Talk with your bike shop and see what they can do to help you out

  3. #3
    Senior Member gregp's Avatar
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    Agree with you, except I would not have even left the shop if the steerer was cut like that. Normally they leave 30-35mm spare (max recommended by the likes of Fox for safety reasons - any longer and you have too much leverage on the steerer creating undue stress on the fork and the headset assembly). 35-40mm stack height for a stem is typical.

    You should have refused to pay for it/leave the shop the moment you saw the fork had been swapped. But still, not your fault. I don't think it's too late to go back and tell them you just noticed this. First thing I would demand an explanation of why the fork is different. You just spent $8.5k with them - you can be a bit fussy.

    If they're being a-holes, just tell them "OK, i need to adjust the bar height, pls add a 10mm spacer", and let them scratch their heads.

    If you do get screwed, you could go with a non-zero degree rise stem.

    Let us know how you go.

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    Senior Member BT180's Avatar
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    First and foremost you should be going back and saying WTF, this is not the fork I paid for. Swapping out components is inexcusable, especially after you just dropped $8k.

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    Senior Member Big JD's Avatar
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    Not sure they gave him the wrong fork but that they cut it too short.

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    Senior Member BT180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big JD View Post
    Not sure they gave him the wrong fork but that they cut it too short.
    He said it appeared to be different to the one he paid for:

    Quote Originally Posted by GrubNut View Post
    Also the fork appeared to be a different one to the one on the bike at the time I paid for it (different colour stickers).

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    Wow. Sounds awful similar to an Australian film about a Jaguar to me...


    Be polite at first, hopefully it is easy to resolve.

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    Senior Member ForkinGreat's Avatar
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    Email them and outline your concerns, as well as take it back to the shop and talk to the manager/owner, not the minions. But make sure you email them.

    Any conversation in person, take notes and confirm that conversation via email. You want to have a record of all communications. Be civil, but don't take any of their BS.



    One time, I bought a brand new bike, got it home, first ride, 300 metres from home, shifted into big cog to climb a hill, came to a crunching halt.

    The rear mech was so badly adjusted, the mech shifted the chain into the gap between the spokes and the cassette and buckled the rear wheel.

    Took it back to the shop and they accused me of fucking with the limit screws. emailed the shop attn the owners and got replacement wheels out of them.

    Next step was going to be consumer affairs.

    Never dealing with the chunts at that bike shop again.
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    Senior Member GrubNut's Avatar
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    Had a polite chat with the shop and explained the issue. They offered to swap the stem on the condition that the existing one was unmarked. Or a free install if I buy a new CSU (not cheap). Not kicking up a fuss about it yet, just considering my options. But I am not really happy either. It's like there's a adjuster missing from the bike.

    I probably should have noticed before handing over the money, but I guess I trusted the shop that any potential issues could be sorted out.
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  10. #10
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    hmm, I can't see any clear outcome. I'd be crossing my fingers but it sounds like the you were too trusting and the shop not surprisingly acted in self interest. Not sure I'd trust them again given that, but you have to consider the type of relationship you want to have with them given the $$ investment.

    As I see it there's a few slim angles a) if the bike was mainstream vs niche ie. a standard build per manufacturer and all associated expectations from a reasonable customer vs. a more customised build per shop or customer request, and if the shop genuinely tinkered with that new mainstream bike to reduce the stack height before you bought it and b) if the fork on your bike was different to the one specced by manufacturer or the one originally described & represented to you
    Be careful with that, it was new once.

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