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Thread: Cleat Position and Calf Pain

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    Senior Member BT180's Avatar
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    Default Cleat Position and Calf Pain

    So I've had a pair of XC orientated Sidi's for years and now that I'm spending more time on the AM/enduro/gravity/whatever you want to call it, side of things I've noticed that my calf muscles are burning and in heaps of pain on longer descents.

    I've now bought some trail/AM/enduro/whatever you want to call it shoes and I have the ability to run the cleats really far back on the shoe - I've read in a few places that this will take the pressure off the calves and stop the pain when descending. Only trade-off is you lose a bit of short burst power when climbing.

    Anyone else mucked around with cleat position and found the same thing?

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    Senior Member teK--'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BT180 View Post
    So I've had a pair of XC orientated Sidi's for years and now that I'm spending more time on the AM/enduro/gravity/whatever you want to call it, side of things I've noticed that my calf muscles are burning and in heaps of pain on longer descents.

    I've now bought some trail/AM/enduro/whatever you want to call it shoes and I have the ability to run the cleats really far back on the shoe - I've read in a few places that this will take the pressure off the calves and stop the pain when descending. Only trade-off is you lose a bit of short burst power when climbing.

    Anyone else mucked around with cleat position and found the same thing?
    position the cleats as far back as the shoes will allow. only roadies and xc riders put their cleats up forward.

    the xc sidi shoes would have also been too stiff for the type of riding you now do; the softer soles on the new shoes would allow better grip and balance for standing up type riding.

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    When your off your seat it puts a lot more pressure on your calves and having the cleats forward acts as a bigger lever and makes it worse. If you do much climbing you may not want to go too far back. It takes a bit of trial and error to find that sweet spot.

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    Senior Member BT180's Avatar
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    Thanks fellas. Looking forward to trying it out and seeing if it helps.

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    Heavy machinery. Dozer's Avatar
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    + 1000000 for having your cleats right back, as far as you can go back for me. I've found it's far more efficient and more power having it as close to the back of the ball of your foot AND it takes tons of aches away, including knee pain and strain for me. I also try to centre the cleat to the point that my shoe rubs my crank a little but I'm getting more of the meat of my foot pushing and pulling on the pedal.

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    There's a few methods outlined here https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com...leat-position/

    I'm running with a combo of method 1&2 and although it's further back than before, I'll prob go further back if I can

    Method 3 outlines the positives (& negatives) of a truly mid-foot position, but there aren't many shoe manufacturers making them
    Be careful with that, it was new once.

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    Senior Member teK--'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schred View Post
    There's a few methods outlined here https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com...leat-position/

    I'm running with a combo of method 1&2 and although it's further back than before, I'll prob go further back if I can

    Method 3 outlines the positives (& negatives) of a truly mid-foot position, but there aren't many shoe manufacturers making them
    Steve Hogg has some excellent info and I have put a lot of his advice to use when fitting my road bike. I don't see his advice as being that relevant to MTB though since you aren't sitting down and spinning most of the time.

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    Senior Member BT180's Avatar
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    This is all sounding really positive, so thanks for the feedback guys. Cheers for the link also, schred. Maybe it's geared towards road riding more, but the principles should remain the same for MTB. Similar to what I've read on this page - http://www.neillsbikefit.com.au/?page_id=348

    Hopefully that clears up my leg issues and I can then address my hands! :)

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    Senior Member pharmaboy's Avatar
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    I seem to remember Sidi coming in for criticism from Steve Hogg for their cleat positioning as not adjustable enough and way forward - it may have changed, but I know his articles made me steer towards shimano mtb shoes for the most amount of rear adjustability for cleats.

    You might be able to fix current shoes with a bit of diy and a drill
    Successful trades with chopsticks McGee, Dirty Dingo, FinancialWar, and gave someone I can't remember a pedal wrench extension.

    And reckons he's going to do 80km per week for 2016 min

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    Quote Originally Posted by teK-- View Post
    Steve Hogg has some excellent info and I have put a lot of his advice to use when fitting my road bike. I don't see his advice as being that relevant to MTB though since you aren't sitting down and spinning most of the time.
    Hear what you are saying, subconsciously prob why I haven't gone as far back as it suggests. He does mention that within the ranges suggested to be more forward focused for sprinting, and more rear(centre)-focused for constant power, how that may apply to mtb disciplines & individuals preferences, up to them.
    Be careful with that, it was new once.

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