Banshee Spitfire

beeb

Likes Dirt
Frame - Banshee Spitfire XL (2018)
Rear shock - 2019 Fox DHX2 (200x57mm) with 550lb SLS spring and RWC roller bearings.
Front shock/fork - 2019 Fox Factory 36 Grip2 37mm offset (140mm travel)
Handlebars - Spank Spike Vibracore 50mm rise (cut to 760mm)
Stem - Hope DH 50mm
Headset - Cane Creek 70 Series
Grips - ODI Elite Pro (So comfy, good feel!)
Saddle - Ergon something...
Seatpost - Vecnum Nivo 212mm Travelfit (non-indexed)
Front brake - Formula Cura 4 w/ 203mm rotor
Rear brake - Formula Cura 4 w/ 203mm rotor
Cranks - Shimano XT M8000
Chainguide - T.B.C
Chain - Shimano HG-701
Pedals - Pedalling Innovations Catalyst
Rear derailleur - Shimano XT M8000 (with WolfTooth Wolf Cage)
Rear shifter - Shimano XT M8000
Cassette - Garbaruk 11-50t (HG driver)
Front hub - Project 321 Boost
Rear hub - Project 321 Boost 216POE (Quiet pawls)
Front rim - Nextie Premium trail 40mm
Rear rim - Nextie Premium Enduro 36mm
Spokes - DT Comps
Nipples - DT Brass
Tyres - Maxxis DHF 2.6" front, Aggressor 2.5" rear.
Tyre Sealant - Stans
Total weight - No idea, don't care.

352205


Basic intention of this bike was to replace my 5010 (<<< clickable link) with something that had a more progressive leverage curve so I could run a coil shock. I don't really know why, but I just don't get on with air shocks. Maybe being a heavier bloke running in the high pressure ranges required to get the sag right doesn't show off their best attributes (I also seem to always somehow push 10-15psi out of them across the course of a big day out too), so coil just feels so much more predictable to me. Predictable is good as predictability is confidence inspiring. I also like having all the damping adjustments as I'm a chronic tinkerer! I chose the DHX2 partly for a wide range of adjustments, but also because I had hoped to install a LiftMTB remote lock-out kit to the shock. However having tried installing the LiftMTB kit, discovering that you need about 4 hands to install it, and somehow accidentally killing the shock's climb switch (now repaired) in the process - I was defeated. Luckily I discovered just how bloody well these Spitfires pedal - so I'm not going to worry about trying again. With the benefit of hindsight it does give me some pangs of regret for not buying an EXT Storia instead, but we'll chalk that one up to experience.

Have only had one ride on it so far, and initial impressions seem really good, though the low stack height effectively makes the bike feel quite 'short' (reach wise), but sometimes I like that so we'll have to see how that plays out long term. I have only just installed the Formula Cura 4's, and even though they aren't properly bedded in yet I can already tell they're going to provide more stopping force - a lot more - than they Hopes the replaced. No more aching knuckles on shuttle days up the high country then hopefully!

Oh, and an FYI for anyone reading regarding the Vecnum Nivo (212mm) dropper - it just fits at full insertion on this XL frame. I have my bikes setup at 750mm from crank centre to seat-rail and it is slammed in the seat tube. Got to say too - the mechanical operation of this dropper and lever is an absolute delight, I had somewhat low expectations of this coming off a BikeYoke Revive 185mm (with WolfTooth lever) and am happy to say I was sorely mistaken - this is even better again. Light lever action with a quiet, precise but still audible thunk at top-out and just-right extension speed. I know it's not everyone's cup off tea, and it's a silly thing to get so enamoured of - but I friggen love this dropper. Plus with the rediculous amount of travel I can position myself basically anywhere over the bike and not have to worry about smacking myself in the nads. So liberating!

For what it's worth, I am currently running it in the high position and have the fork set a 140mm travel as this is intended more as a burly trail bike than an 'Enduro' sled, so the steeper angles are a bit more all-day ride friendly.

If you made it through all that - thanks for reading! :)
 
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Nambra

Postmeridian
Noice rig @beeb! You’re really stretching that stack height with 50m riser bars aren’t you. Coming off the 5010 means you’re probably used to it though!
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
Noice rig @beeb! You’re really stretching that stack height with 50m riser bars aren’t you. Coming off the 5010 means you’re probably used to it though!
Haha, yeah it'd be way too low with flattish bars even with a bunch of spacers. I like the bars fairly high anyway which exaggerates it a bit also. I've juggled spacers and stems around already and this setup feels pretty spot on.
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
Love all of your builds @beeb and this plus the departed 5010 both look like well thought out bikes you can take to most places. Should be great to ride and coils on the rear always feel super.

Enjoy and weigh it one day, you really do want to know :)

Watch out for horses with that water bottle too.

Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
Love all of your builds @beeb and this plus the departed 5010 both look like well thought out bikes you can take to most places. Should be great to ride and coils on the rear always feel super.

Enjoy and weigh it one day, you really do want to know :)

Watch out for horses with that water bottle too.
Cheers @Mr Crudley - hopefully amongst all my waffling someone might find some useful info, haha.

And you're right - I like the alrounder nature of trail bikes. I'm not great at riding choppy rock at high speed, so I try to setup my bikes to be fun on the flowier stuff - drops, berms, doubles and the like is where I find my fun. The coil is definitely nice, but those shock eyelet roller-bearings take it to another level! Would recommend them to anyone whose shock (air or coil) has any kind of rotation happening in its travel. It just breaks away so much easier.

The weight would be interesting from a comparison point of view, but ultimately I'm only interested in how heavy it 'feels', and this build is definitely not bothersome. I can feel a little more weight than my 5010, but because it's added frame weight it's central and doesn't really effect the ride negatively (would make climbs worse in theory, but the seated position on the Banshee is better for me and the anti-squat holds this bike up more so it actually feels more efficient in use). Also after riding my AM hardtail this weekend with a lightweight Recon 2.35 rear, I reckon might get loose with this bike too and try a Recon 2.4 rear on this at some stage to bring the rotational and unsprung mass down compared to the Double-Down 2.5 Aggressor on there currently, as saving ~400g there will have a much bigger impact on bike performance than 400g from the frame (I will also be getting a fresh 2.5 DHF trying to chase a little more front-end precision and the 2.6 is getting a little tired anyway)

Oh, and the bottle is only there as a toolholder. Feck drinking out of that!
 

The Reverend

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Sweet looking rig, and I know what you mean about the stack height. Nothing 10mm more fork won't fix up for you. :^)
 
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dh1

Likes Dirt
Looking awesome! Jealous about the coil!
I’m confused though, a low stack height has more reach then a high stack height yet the comments here seem to say the opposite....
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
Cheers @Mr Crudley - hopefully amongst all my waffling someone might find some useful info, haha.
Always good to hear. We are all here to learn what we can one way or another.

And you're right - I like the alrounder nature of trail bikes. I'm not great at riding choppy rock at high speed, so I try to setup my bikes to be fun on the flowier stuff - drops, berms, doubles and the like is where I find my fun. The coil is definitely nice, but those shock eyelet roller-bearings take it to another level! Would recommend them to anyone whose shock (air or coil) has any kind of rotation happening in its travel. It just breaks away so much easier.
130-140mm should be enough for most places unless you are lucky enough to live near a ski resort in summer. I prefer the same sort of trails, I like techy stuff but always reach my limits much quicker.

I have invested in some shock needle bearings and they are a cool addition. The Heckler has a largish roller on the rear for a few years now and it has resolved any bushing wear plus much nicer small bump compliance. An easy but worthy addition.

The weight would be interesting from a comparison point of view, but ultimately I'm only interested in how heavy it 'feels', and this build is definitely not bothersome. I can feel a little more weight than my 5010, but because it's added frame weight it's central and doesn't really effect the ride negatively (would make climbs worse in theory, but the seated position on the Banshee is better for me and the anti-squat holds this bike up more so it actually feels more efficient in use). Also after riding my AM hardtail this weekend with a lightweight Recon 2.35 rear, I reckon might get loose with this bike too and try a Recon 2.4 rear on this at some stage to bring the rotational and unsprung mass down compared to the Double-Down 2.5 Aggressor on there currently, as saving ~400g there will have a much bigger impact on bike performance than 400g from the frame (I will also be getting a fresh 2.5 DHF trying to chase a little more front-end precision and the 2.6 is getting a little tired anyway)
I hear you there. A have always liked lighter weight nimble bikes and the Xizang brought bucket fills of that. It is double edged sword and can make everything more nervous once it gets a bit chunky. Weight sure helps to let yourself mow straight through things that just don't feel as good otherwise.

Saying that, it sure is easier to make a light bike heavy vs. a heavier bike lighter IMHO.

Going back to the rear shock, I always wanted to give a Ti coil a try.

What is your early-days verdict of the VPP vs. KS link? - Doh....

Oh, and the bottle is only there as a toolholder. Feck drinking out of that!
Wise move sir. If it held water I'd pay money to watch you drink out of that while rolling down a trail :)


Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
 
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beeb

Likes Dirt
Looking awesome! Jealous about the coil!
I’m confused though, a low stack height has more reach then a high stack height yet the comments here seem to say the opposite....
When you bring the bars up a lot with spacers or riser stems the bars get closer because of the angle of the steerer tube. Reach is just a measurement along a horizontal plane, but the lower the bars the further forward you have to lean to reach them.
 

dh1

Likes Dirt
When you bring the bars up a lot with spacers or riser stems the bars get closer because of the angle of the steerer tube. Reach is just a measurement along a horizontal plane, but the lower the bars the further forward you have to lean to reach them.
Yeah I completely get that. Basically what I said in my post.

Is what your really saying in your previous posts this;
the stack specified on the geometry chart is low and for that specified stack the specified reach was decent but by the time you have set your bar at the right height your reach is now smaller then you would like it to be?
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
Is what your really saying in your previous posts this;
the stack specified on the geometry chart is low and for that specified stack the specified reach was decent but by the time you have set your bar at the right height your reach is now smaller then you would like it to be?
Yep. Sorry for the confusion. :)
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
What is your early-days verdict of the VPP vs. KS link? - Doh....
Love it.

If I'm honest I was struggling a bit with the VPP when pushing hard on descents the 5010. The very firm initial leverage ratio makes it responsive, but also a bit of a teeth rattler at times (rock gardens and jump landings spring to mind). I also found the softer leverage in the midstroke made it a little too easy to blow through the sag point when climbing, but was mostly only noticeable with a bit of a pitching fore/aft when riding up through corrugations or rocks (admittedly it was exaggerated by my height and resulting fairly rearward saddle position). That same unpredictable pitching sensation could reveal itself on jumps take-offs too, which never helped my already low jumping confidence. I felt I could tune it to either be a great climber and firm and lively descender that'd be great on really smooth trails, or a great descender on more enduro/techy trails but a mediocre climber. It was not being able to find a middle ground setting that worked well for me that me me look for a new frame to transfer to.

To be fair - it's not that VPP is a bad system, just take a look at what the 50/01 boys or Danny MacAskill do on 5010's - I just wanted something a little more forgiving to ride.

Initial impressions of the KS-link on the Spitfire - It feels like a very well balanced hybrid between VPP and a Horst-link. It has the taut climbing and lack of pedal-bob of the VPP, with basically perfect (for my tastes - ie: a lot of) anti-squat, mixed with the progressive leverage ratio and rock absorbtion of a Horst-link.

More time will give greater insight, but initial impressions suggest it should address what I wasn't liking on the 5010 while keeping what I did like. It's efficient, reasonably playful (even with the coil), and just a simpler suspension platform to ride hard.
 

the drizzle

Likes Bikes and Dirt
This is the best spitty build I have seen.

The thing is a complete weapon!

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 
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