Polygon Trid ZZ, anyone seen one?

pink poodle

Our man in Japan
I really like the idea of a Slopestyle bike, but the advantages seem so few over a Dirt Jump hardtail.
My Hardtail DJ with my forks dropped to 80mm is still a big bike to handle on BMX jumps, and any bigger jumps where it would be nice to have rear suspension to soften the landing, have enough brake bumps and tree roots to make a plusher bike seem more appropriate

Could you get small-medium bump compliance on one of these things and not lose that firm jumping platform that they are designed to have?
Good question...either I am amazingly smooth or I just don't have the sensitivity that everyone else seems to whine about when it comes to small bump sensitivity on a dual suspension bike. For reference here is my current rice's build thread:

https://www.rotorburn.com/forums/showthread.php?295484-Poodle-style-a-second-vision

I'm running about 15% sag in the rear and 20% up front in 120mm. The bike is used for about 15-20km of commuting most days, skate park, street, dj, freeride trails, enduro trail, even am trail sometimes...

My local trails (glenrock lagoon in newcastle) are mostly hard packed clay pitted with brake bumps and ruts (because people can't ride), so there isn't a lot of small bumps by my reckoning. There is a few small (up to 1m drops) and jumps ranging up to about 5m or 6m and a set of poorly maintained table tops dirt jumps. Nothing particularly technical or hard core, but enough fun. I've ridden these trails for a long time on 100mm dj hard tails right through to 9 inches of freeride madness. The current pivot is my favourite bike of all torque there. The bike glides over this kind of stuff like I'm on a cloud, with the bonus of being small, light, and very responsive over jumps. When I feel inclined it is easy enough to ride the am/xc trail that runs through the place as well. There is also a 7km flat amd up hill ride to the trails, and 7km down hill and flat ride home.

I've taken it to Ourimbah and ridden the dh and gravity trails there a lot of times. The only spot there I have any concerns with is the rocky chute at the end of the top section, where you enter via a pallet ramp and exit via a step down onto long wooden ramp then have a brief straight stretch of sandy soil before the rocky winding mod section starts (I'm sure locals will understand). This is a stretch of narrow straight trail littered with bowling ball rocks and sharp edges lined by close trees. With only 120mm up front I'm a little concerned that the front could hook up easily and throw me. This hasn't happened yet, but I do ride it a bit slower than on my dh bike.

I guess I'm saying that I find the slope style bike to be more versatile than a hard tail and more comfortable, without the bull of a bigger bike. I've owned quite a few bikes over the years and a lot of different suspension designs. I also don't enjoy riding hardtails. After a few hours of chugging around on them, even just commuting, I find the vibrations shit me and give me a sore back.
 

stinky1138

Likes Dirt
I'm with you on the circus, it's a sick fork for the cash. A few chums have them and they look, feel, and tunability is great. If you're afraid of busting them, buy 2 and you're still ahead...I personally run a fox 36 Talas set at 120mm. I have no complaints other than the regular need of servicing. I'll always wish I had one of the late model Marzocchi 55CR slope forks. For this type of riding Marzocchi have long had their shit dialled.

What's not to like about this bike as a whole? It is a very close copy of the trek ticket s and also the old nuke proof slope style frame, as well as some similarities to the rocky mountain slayer ss. It can be ridden on street, jumps, skate park, or trails with a few adjustments to shock and tyre pressures. Down sides are that a full rigid single speed dj bike is a lot less fuss...which is great if you're hucking a lot of concrete klunker style. If you're not, this is just a lot of fun with a little comfort factor thrown in.
I have heard good things about the marz slope. Very good things. I dunno, the fox was on a friend's bike so could just have been the set up i didn't like. My 36 float is plush but i do feel it's over kill for me. My 32 float is super plush as well. Kinda why i was surprised the 831 wasn't amazing. I know it's unpopular opinion but i really like the dj1.

Full rigid ss bike is the shit. If does hurt joints tho. Nothing beats it for epic smoothness on concrete.
 

pink poodle

Our man in Japan
I have heard good things about the marz slope. Very good things. I dunno, the fox was on a friend's bike so could just have been the set up i didn't like. My 36 float is plush but i do feel it's over kill for me. My 32 float is super plush as well. Kinda why i was surprised the 831 wasn't amazing. I know it's unpopular opinion but i really like the dj1.

Full rigid ss bike is the shit. If does hurt joints tho. Nothing beats it for epic smoothness on concrete.
I do weigh (I suspect) significantly more than you, which may go some length to explaining the different requirements, being that I'm about 90-95kg.

I'm also a 15mm axle hater.
 

Ultra Lord

Beanie Fitment Specialist
argyle with compression adjust, pretty hard to beat. Stiff, strong and reliable af. Nothing but a stiff spring and some dampener adjustments. Noticeably stiffer than the circus, and less noise.

Tbh I've never found the need to upgrade from my hardtail, even riding some jump lines built for full suspension am bikes. You get used to whatever you buy and learn how to compensate. Love the hardtails simplicity though. When my trail bikes broken from some stupid part designed with weight in mind, my little blue tranny is still going strong with no maintenance love what so ever.

In saying that, 10/10 would love to try a slope bike like this. It would be awesome fun down bike park flow trails I reckon.
 

stinky1138

Likes Dirt
argyle with compression adjust, pretty hard to beat. Stiff, strong and reliable af. Nothing but a stiff spring and some dampener adjustments. Noticeably stiffer than the circus, and less noise.
Personal preference really. My circus never makes any noises, nor has anyone else's that i've seen/ridden. I found the argyles to be super heavy and clunky but they were not the RCT version. I'm not a RockShox fan, I can never get them set up to suit me. I love my vengeance more than any other fork i've had.

I do weigh (I suspect) significantly more than you, which may go some length to explaining the different requirements, being that I'm about 90-95kg.

I'm also a 15mm axle hater.
Meh, not by much. I'm like a potato with carrots for arms and marshmallows for legs. and a Grape as a head. Literally what i look like.

We've got 15, 20, and qr forks on various dj bikes right now. The 15 and qr are both 100mm and on the same frame with very similar builds. The qr float has a dt thru axle with a 28h 400g rim and the 15 is an 831 on a 32h shimano rim. Seriously, and I do actually mean this, between me and hubs we cannot feel a stiffness/flex difference between them. It is noticeable to go to the 20mm forks (which are also only 80mm) tho. All 32mm chassis. Q.E.D. 15mm is = or < a well set up qr and therefore pointless. 20mm or bust.
 
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