Project Car / Motorbike thread. Let's see 'em.

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
There was a reason for that - it's explained in the first video.

Pulls 2.2+G in corners! :eek:
Fark, yeah well when that breaks traction it's gonna swing out pretty quickly! I didn't watch more than about 30 seconds of the vid to be fair, jusr chanced upon the bit half(ish) way through where he nearly loops it real hard. Kudos to him for the build work, but interesting to see if some more suspension tuning/mods could calm it down a bit in the long term...
 

rstim

Likes Dirt
I've posted another video of this car earlier:


If you are going to build your own racecar, may as well engineer the entire thing yourself, with a paddle-shift gearbox, 9000rpm V6 ZQ motor with hybrid electric power.

Fucking. Mental.
That car is crazy looks and sounds great too.

Have you seen Andy Forrest's (crazy genius Scottish dude) latest build? He's making a time attack 4wd Caterham powered by twin turbo LS7 and bulk aero. Should be proper mental when finished, posts update on his Facebook if you want to have a look. Previous car was the Strom trooper Impreza that came to world time attack a few years back.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
What would you do?

Pilot bearing bore in the crank is slightly out of spec, so the bearing can be (just) slid and pulled out with a finger.

By the time ive pulled the crank out to have the bearing recess machined out to take a bearing 2mm larger diameter (and put new bearing shells and rod bolts in, replaced the timing kits thats 60% of the way through its life - stuff you may as well/should renew if its off...) Id be up for about $500.

Or - distress the bearing recess a bit with a punch and use some Loctite 680 retaining fluid and cross my fingers...
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
What would you do?

Pilot bearing bore in the crank is slightly out of spec, so the bearing can be (just) slid and pulled out with a finger.

By the time ive pulled the crank out to have the bearing recess machined out to take a bearing 2mm larger diameter (and put new bearing shells and rod bolts in, replaced the timing kits thats 60% of the way through its life - stuff you may as well/should renew if its off...) Id be up for about $500.

Or - distress the bearing recess a bit with a punch and use some Loctite 680 retaining fluid and cross my fingers...
The later, and don't worry about it unless it becomes a problem later (unlikely).
 

Flow-Rider

Wheel size expert
What would you do?

Pilot bearing bore in the crank is slightly out of spec, so the bearing can be (just) slid and pulled out with a finger.

By the time ive pulled the crank out to have the bearing recess machined out to take a bearing 2mm larger diameter (and put new bearing shells and rod bolts in, replaced the timing kits thats 60% of the way through its life - stuff you may as well/should renew if its off...) Id be up for about $500.

Or - distress the bearing recess a bit with a punch and use some Loctite 680 retaining fluid and cross my fingers...
Renno quality sheesh.
Was the old spigot bearing tight in the bore of the crank?

If it's a car you're going to thrash, it's only going to get worse and cause other issues eventually like premature wear on the gearbox input shaft bearings, leaking gear box seals and binding of clutch centres on the input splines. Even if you witness mark the contact surface they usually come loose again I've found.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Renno quality sheesh.
Was the old spigot bearing tight in the bore of the crank?

If it's a car you're going to thrash, it's only going to get worse and cause other issues eventually like premature wear on the gearbox input shaft bearings, leaking gear box seals and binding of clutch centres on the input splines. Even if you witness mark the contact surface they usually come loose again I've found.
The engine has never had a pilot bearing fitted before because it was attached to an automatic - so 14 years of light surface corrosion and then me stupidly running a bit of emery paper over it to clean it up has taken "just" enough material off to make it not an interference fit.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
What if you witness the shit out of it?
Flow is correct that it will eventually beat the ridges back down and put it back at square one. The only "proper" repair is to machine it out for a larger bearing or replace the crank...

But. Maybe the loctite keeps it tight enough that it doesn't move around, and maybe I stake the end of the recess the keep it from coming out if it does come loose...

Super annoying. Dont really want to pull the crank and there is certainly no need otherwise - its a really nice low kms engine.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Distress is haakon speak for witness.

@Haakon
Get yourself a dirty big hammer, belt in some punch marks and whack a metric shitload of 620 in there. Clean everything really really well and you’ll need a press and some heat to get it apart.
distress the surface with a punch, creating a bunch of witness marks from the punch? something like that...

I don't think its a very hard working bearing, its not a super tight fit on the input shaft nose at least, and the input shaft is solid and with a big front bearing - it would be a floating input shaft otherwise i suspect.

The Murphy is strong in this one. I even had a good crank in the other engine that i then accidentally left out in the rain when i got distracted by crashing my bike, so thats stuffed now.
 

Ultra Lord

Hurts. Requires Money. And is nerdy.
The engine has never had a pilot bearing fitted before because it was attached to an automatic - so 14 years of light surface corrosion and then me stupidly running a bit of emery paper over it to clean it up has taken "just" enough material off to make it not an interference fit.
Give yourself an uppercut you peanut head. Keep emery well the fuck away from interference fit surfaces. Scotch pad will do the trick usually, if it doesn’t it’s too far gone anyway.

But, nothing a bunch of loctite and a centre punch won’t fix.
Everything fails eventually, get it machined to the larger bearing when the rest of those things you listed need replacing.
 
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