Tyre Chat because we all love Black Rubber Goods

AaronM

Likes Dirt
Seriously though as a newb the tyre thing is epically confusing.

I’ll need to buy a new rear in about 200km more of riding - so 750km of hard pack dirt, gravel and concrete/tar (the latter being my most travelled on surface) and the factory fitted Merida specific Kenda will be bald.

That means I’m trying to understand options, and relate that to factors like cost and life expectancy.

So I guess as questions:
What kind of life are people getting from their tyres, over what terrain?

If I want something easier rolling for hard surfaces, but need some bite on looser dirt/gravel how do I best select a compromise tyre?

Do I just buy some $40 thing and worry about more important things or do I buy a $80 tyre and worry about more important things for twice the distance?

For me tubeless is a mind fuck I don’t want :)

My frame can at best take 29x2.3 I think. It has 29x2.2 on it currently.

What’s the deal between foldable and wired when it comes to application?
 

droenn

Fat Man's XC President
When I was using my bike for a mix of commuting and trails, I found the Maxxis Ardent Race were good around Canberra. It didn't wear too fast on the bitumen, and was fine for hitting up some trails. I guess paired up with an Ikon?

For budget option, the Onzas have been really cheap lately, so if you can grab them on special they're worth looking into.

Don't go for wirebead, I think they are generally the thinner walled tyres anyway(?)
 

Mr Crudley

Wheel size expert
Have to agree on a lot of that.

Ardents, like most 60/70 duro Maxxis tyres, seem to last very well. Mine still look almost new and they shouldn't.

I like a bigger, puffer profile tyre up front. This should wear out quicker.

I had left tubes in my old Heckler and have no reason to change. I run about 30psi up front and 32psi on the rear and never have to root around with sealant nor need lower pressures. I haven't flatted for ages - touch wood. Tubeless compatible tyres with a tube are pretty indestructible for JRA riding.

Tyres are a personal preference thing. Get a balance between longevity and traction and you are good to go.
 

AaronM

Likes Dirt
What bike, and where are you riding?
29er hardtail. Riding on a mix of Canberra bike paths and the walking and riding trails in the various parks around the place.

Doing it for fitness and relaxation not commuting. Actually in part it’s so I can get a reasonable distance out in the nature parks to fly my drone in peace :)
 

T-Rex

Template denier
Keep riding the ones you have until you are down to the canvas. You don't need knobs or tread for the surfaces you are riding on. They are actually over-rated, I enjoy a bald rear tyre, which grips a lot better than you expect on all but very loose surfaces, rolls faster, and slides around a bit for more fun in corners.

You are not at the point where you need to get into tubeless.

When you really need a new tyre, go cheap, and put the savings towards your new, upgraded, dual suspension MTB.
 

AaronM

Likes Dirt
Keep riding the ones you have until you are down to the canvas. You don't need knobs or tread for the surfaces you are riding on. They are actually over-rated, I enjoy a bald rear tyre, which grips a lot better than you expect on all but very loose surfaces, rolls faster, and slides around a bit for more fun in corners.
Aka pretend I’m 12 again and my parents couldn’t afford much in the way of fancy stuff ;)
 

creaky

XMAS Plumper
For that riding I’d be looking through the maxxis exo range, probably something like the Ardent Race, or rekon race.

Double Defence style casings would be overkill for that use unless you want ultimate reliability at the sacrifice of weight that you probably don’t need.
 

Flow-Rider

Wheel size expert
I've found the Ikons and crossmarks to work well on the rear for road and trail use. Tyres are personal preference really, trial and error but you usually stay away from anything with soft rubber in the centre of the tyre and has biggish knobbies on it for road use. If you're not riding a lot of tech stuff on the trails you could go to a Maxxis Pace tyre.
 

Cardy George

Piercing rural members since 1981
I've run an Onza Svelt on pretty much that exact mix of surfaces. The knobs are miniscule compared to others, which makes it a rear only proposition, but paired with a good front tyre it's pretty entertaining. I put it on in May, took it off in September when a nail went through the sidewall, and I reckon it's only halfway worn. $31 +shipping at MTB direct right now.

Tubeless isn't as much hassle as you think, I put a tube in the rear of mine for the first time in 18 months and bloody hated it.
 
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