2018 Ibis Ripmo

beeb

Likes Dirt
I’ve got a 34 Factory from 2017.

But the Ibis site seems pretty keen on a 44 offset.

EDIT: I see what you're saying, so I could change travel and offset with one of those. Or is the travel change an internal option?
Travel change is done with a replacement airshaft I believe. Offset is a CSU replacement. 44mm offset CSU should be easy to come by as it's standard 27.5 offset. New CSUs were in the ballpark of $380-450ish from memory, then whatever install costs needed - ie: if it needs bushes reamed or anything like that.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
Travel change is done with a replacement airshaft I believe. Offset is a CSU replacement. 44mm offset CSU should be easy to come by as it's standard 27.5 offset. New CSUs were in the ballpark of $380-450ish from memory, then whatever install costs needed - ie: if it needs bushes reamed or anything like that.
Thanks, I've had a look and seems like something Cyclinic can do. So I'm up for that, a longer dropper and the rest would move straight over.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
They've released a rather silly video with the old David Attenborough trope. Fuck I did one of those nearly 20 years ago and it wasn't funny then.


Anyway, it does look really nice.


Look forward to a couple of reviews. I still really like my LS, so genuinely curious about all that extra reach.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
Only after riding both would I be able to make up my mind.

But I do feel like a lightweight Ripmo build would suit me best...something to encourage me to get off the brakes more but still rip through the tight stuff.
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
But I do feel like a lightweight Ripmo build would suit me best...something to encourage me to get off the brakes more but still rip through the tight stuff.
With the benefit of hindsight I sort of wish I'd kept the Ripmo and put some light wheels and a light rear tyre on the back (kept the DHF up front).

It was a good bike but always felt slow to get moving (not a fault of the bike, more my mediocre fitness). Light wheels and tyres would've changed its character completely.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
Rooney got back to me with local pricing:

Ripley 4 - Performance Fox shock - $4590
Ripley 4 - Factory Fox shock - $4790

They haven't worked out pricing on built bikes yet.
 

slider_phil

Likes Bikes and Dirt
In line with other boutique brands in terms of frame only pricing. The numbers on this look perfect for trail and with the right parts, be light enough for endurance racing.

I've fallen in love with with DW Link since getting my Turner last year and eventually want to replace my Intense. Maybe I could sell the Intense and Turner and build up one of these
 

The Reverend

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Looks nice, but that same length rear end is a deal breaker for me. Once you get XL or XXL if it's offered it feels like you're standing on BMX axle pegs riding bikes with short rear centres.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
Oh, and this review is a good 'un:

https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountain-bikes/first-ride-ibis-ripley-2/

Shedding the dual eccentric linkage made the new Ripley stiffer than its predecessor. The connections between rear and front triangles are now wider and further apart, offering a burlier feel when putting lateral force into the rear end. But burli-er doesn't mean burly. Under my 190-pound frame, I sensed a bit of deflection in the 27-pound Ripley I rode. Those times when I was in Ripmo terrain, approaching Ripmo speeds, I learned that this is not a Ripmo. This update is not an effort to rebrand the Ripley into a different category. It is a way to make it even better at what it already does.
Knowing what I know, this is good to know!
 

slider_phil

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Looks nice, but that same length rear end is a deal breaker for me. Once you get XL or XXL if it's offered it feels like you're standing on BMX axle pegs riding bikes with short rear centres.
One of the better perks of being "normal" sized. Bike frames, forks etc are all sized and valved for the majority. It makes it harder for you bigger (and smaller) guys to make something work well out of the box.

My first world problem would be that the sizing recommendation puts me right between a medium and large
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
These look so good. If I was buying - I would definitely buy one of these over a Ripmo. Ripmo IMO climbed really well, but didn't feel that quick when hitting the pedals with the shock 'open' when on the flat or down slopes. It also wasn't all that supple on square edges, so if I'm going to put up with a bit of square-edged chatter I'd rather get quicker pedaling as a trade-off. With light wheels and tyres this thing would be so rapid on Blue and moderate Black trails.
 

Asininedrivel

Likes Dirt
It also wasn't all that supple on square edges, so if I'm going to put up with a bit of square-edged chatter I'd rather get quicker pedaling as a trade-off.
Were you running an X2 on your Ripmo?

I'm finding similar on my HD4... the X2 is a bit of a black hole when it comes to tuning but messing around with high speed compression (less) and high speed rebound (more... I think) is slowly ironing out the chunder.

The numbers on the new Ripley are making it look veeeeery appealling as a new trail bike in a year or so, depending on what Santa Cruz release for the Tallboy/Hightower replacement (hopefully a 29er version of the new 5010).
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
Were you running an X2 on your Ripmo?

I'm finding similar on my HD4... the X2 is a bit of a black hole when it comes to tuning but messing around with high speed compression (less) and high speed rebound (more... I think) is slowly ironing out the chunder.

The numbers on the new Ripley are making it look veeeeery appealling as a new trail bike in a year or so, depending on what Santa Cruz release for the Tallboy/Hightower replacement (hopefully a 29er version of the new 5010).
Yep, had an X2 on it, and yep - never really found that 'sweet spot' tune for it.

I have a DHX2 I've put on two other bikes now that I've been able to dial in 'close enough' fairly easily though - so I suspect it was something with the curve of the airspring not suiting what I wanted rather than the damping side. I did play a little with volume spacers but gave up before I ever nailed a tune as the bike fit felt off for me anyway and I sold it.

In reality, a DPX2 probably would've suited me better for that bike anyway, but I'm sure the X2 could've worked well with more effort put in.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
the bike fit felt off for me anyway and I sold it.
Remind me again what the problem was with the fit on the Ripmo? Looks like the fit on an XL Ripley v4 would be similar.

I think we're the same height, and have similar bike conundrums.

Trying to decide whether to upgrade my Ripley to the new one, or to risk a large Craftworks (which looks like it'd be a tad bigger than my current Ripley).

Both options would probably cost a similar amount, albeit with the Craftworks I would have an extra bike..
 

beeb

Likes Dirt
Remind me again what the problem was with the fit on the Ripmo? Looks like the fit on an XL Ripley v4 would be similar.

I think we're the same height, and have similar bike conundrums.

Trying to decide whether to upgrade my Ripley to the new one, or to risk a large Craftworks (which looks like it'd be a tad bigger than my current Ripley).

Both options would probably cost a similar amount, albeit with the Craftworks I would have an extra bike..
I'm 6'2", but also have a slightly dodgy lower back which makes me fussier about fit than I should be. Reach on the XL Ripmo was 495mm, which was just too much for me. I could've stuck with it, but it demanded an aggressive riding stance all the time - and sometimes I just want to pootle along on mellower trails. I also prefer very short chainstays so the bike just felt huge to me.

Personally, now I would prefer the Ripley in a size L (475mm reach) with a ~50mm stem as that would have reach in my sweet spot, and be a bit easier to weight the front and I'd prefer its slightly shorter chainstays compared to the Ripmo too. The Ripmo was amazing when the trails straightened up and the length stabilised everything, but it was just a little much for me on tighter trails. It had strengths and weaknesses, but would've ended up pretty much just being a bike I'd use at the high-country, and then there's bikes that would be more supple and fun in that kind of terrain so ended up in a no-mans land for me.

The Ripley would be great for XC-ish riding, moderate blues and blacks, and still be capable off high-country trips if you respect the limits of the bike.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
Good feedback. I'm 6'3", but haven't really found the fit of my Ripley all that bad. I do feel like I'd like more bike out the front of me for techy descents, but I enjoy the current compact feel on tighter stuff.

Adding a shitload of reach by moving up to the XL might spoil things for a lot of my riding though, not sure.
 
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