CO2 Cartridge inflators - worth trying?

scblack

Leucocholic
Hi guys, after a flat today on my roadie, I though I might give the CO2 bulb inflators a go. I have good little pump, but it takes plenty of work to get a road tyre up to proper pressure. And when you're tired from a ride that is effort I do not want to be wasting.

Are they worth it?

Does a bulb just do one tube? So each replaced tube means a bulb used up? I have heard some people have to use more than one - will it take a couple of goes to get used to, or are they easy?
 

JTmofo

XC Enthusiast
Hi guys, after a flat today on my roadie, I though I might give the CO2 bulb inflators a go. I have good little pump, but it takes plenty of work to get a road tyre up to proper pressure. And when you're tired from a ride that is effort I do not want to be wasting.

Are they worth it?

Does a bulb just do one tube? So each replaced tube means a bulb used up? I have heard some people have to use more than one - will it take a couple of goes to get used to, or are they easy?
I bring one when I have a backpack on for longer rides. I use 16g cartridges and top up with a hand pump if required.
You can get 25g cart too. They are a handy and cheap device that you might only use twice a year if youre unlucky.

Buy one...
 

Travis22

Likes Dirt
I used a small pump for general rides and have had to used it 4-5 times over the last couple years. Really isnt that much effort and i cannot see me replacing it with C02 on general rides.

That said for XC racing i carry a C02 inflator. Was starting to think id wasted my money but flatted 2/3rds of the way through the Tathra Enduro this year and boy oh boy was i glad that i didnt need to use the handpump (was absolutely knackered). Just popped in a new tube and in about 5 seconds it was up to pressure.

One thing to be aware of is i dont think the C02 inflators will put out enough pressure to seat a bead entirely. Ive only ever put in 1x16g cylinder into a new tube and id estimate it gets it to about 30psi? I bought the lezyne head which had a open/ close knob / valve thingie so its nice to be able to screw the cylinder into the head then fit it on the bike then when ready open the valve and control the release / stop it if something isnt right.

Travis.
 

TonyMax

Caviar tastes on a popcorn budget
On a roadie with 700C wheels the normal 16g cartridge is just enough for one tyre.

Your local Aldi may still have stock of these for $10 they were on sale a couple of weeks ago, comes with one cartridge to see if you like it. They might be in the locked cabinet in your local store:

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I have used the stuff a few times and it's great for a quick way to get back rolling again.

I've been told that one 16g canister is not enough to fill a 29er MTB with enough to ride on.

The Aldi one I have and most of the good ones have a screw valve or other press valve so that you don't accidentally put all your CO2 into the atmosphere. Seal it on the tube valve then open the screw to let the gas out/in.
 

Zam

Likes Dirt
I havent had to use one yet, but my mate has a one and carries a couple of canisters, used it the other week when getting a flat and was great, super quick and easy.

Im converted and getting to carry just incase.
 

Flow-Rider

Wheel size expert
They can be more trouble than what they're worth sometimes but when they work right worth every cent.

I've seen people with jammed prester valves on road bikes push the inflator harder and harder until all of a sudden it goes and blows the tyre clean off the rim or the valve on inflator ices up and they can't stop it from leaking. I wouldn't buy the cheap inflators and have a few practices at home before you actually need it for a real flat. Carry at least 2 canisters incase you fail with the first and you can buy bigger canisters for the larger MTB tyres. I hate carrying them around as they are heavy and you need to tie them together as they rattle around everywhere.
 

Nath8

Likes Dirt
I've been using/carrying one of these inflators for years. No way I'd ever carry a normal hand pump again!
They are easy to put in your jersey pocket, carry a couple of spare canisters and never worry about it again. I'm always pumping up riding buddies flat tyres.
For the road bike, 16g canister is fine and for the MTB I carry the bigger size canisters.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
They can be more trouble than what they're worth sometimes but when they work right worth every cent.

I've seen people with jammed prester valves on road bikes push the inflator harder and harder until all of a sudden it goes and blows the tyre clean off the rim or the valve on inflator ices up and they can't stop it from leaking. I wouldn't buy the cheap inflators and have a few practices at home before you actually need it for a real flat. Carry at least 2 canisters incase you fail with the first and you can buy bigger canisters for the larger MTB tyres. I hate carrying them around as they are heavy and you need to tie them together as they rattle around everywhere.
This. Don't replace the pump, supplement it. Too easy to misfire your only CO2 & be left stranded.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
Topeak make a combined pump CO2 inflator. A 16g is enough for a roadie. You will need to do some pumping first for a mtb, then use cartridge to do the hard work.

Cheap source of bulbs is http://www.finewhip.com.au. they also have the bigger cartridge sizes.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
I run the gauntlet with 2 x CO2 inflators in my quick ride waistpack. I haven't had to us them yet but even it is all goes south then it usually isn't a long walk back home or to the trailhead. The pump stays in my backpack for longer rides.
 

Dozer

Heavy machinery.
Staff member
They are so easy to use and so very much worth it.
Here's a recent example: I had a bit of glass ruin a tube on my roadie. Luckily I carry a spare tube, mini pump and a Co2. I took the wheel off, found the hole in the tube so I knew where to look on the tyre for the glass, got the new tube out, put a small amount of air in to set it in the tyre and put the bead back on. (This next step is very crucial to using canisters) You have to make sure the tube is in the tyre and not pinched between the tyre bead and the rim. A burst of air from a canister will pop the new tube unless it is set in the tyre properly! Once you've checked that, you're ready to use the Co2.
My pump has a head on it that acts as a canister inflater as well. You screw the canister onto the hose of the pump but not so much that the pin pops and opens the canister, just thread it on slightly. Put the hose on the new tube and screw it on. You then screw the canister onto the pump's hose until it opens the seal on the canister and air rapidly fills the tube, almost instantly. One canister for me puts my tyre pressure up to the point I like it but I do give it a few good pumps with the pump to ensure its firm.
It's that easy and is so much quicker. I use this pump https://www.mountainbikesdirect.com.au/lezyne-pressure-drive-cfh-grey-mini-pump-and-co2-i and it's totally awesome.
 

TonyMax

Caviar tastes on a popcorn budget
For anyone who hasn't used them before they come with the little foam sleeve because they get firkin cold when you use them. Freezer burn on your fingers isn't a fun thing. Use the sleeve.
 

Robb

Likes Dirt
Airlines aren't a fan. Always getting asked when I travel with my bike if I've got them in the bag.
 
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