NBN Options (Sydney)

mtb1611

Seymour
Greetings all. Apologies if this has been posted before but the title was/is too short for the search function to handle; feel free to direct me to existing threads if need be.
Currently on Telstra ADSL2 in South Western Sydney however this will be switched off in August and as such I'm looking for NBN options. I've heard that TPG are a decent option however having said that I've not yet spoken to anyone in my area who is happy with their NBN connection, regardless of supplier.
Any tips or suggestions from those in the know would be appreciated. Cheers!
 

droenn

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I haven't got any experience yet, but after reading up on different ISPs, I've signed up with AussieBB. Gets installed just after easter weekend.
On TPG for ADSL now, they have been fine for the time I've had them.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
I believe most of the issues arise from how congested the service providers run their interconnects to NBN in each of the POIs.

The charges can be rather large, hence the juggle between the SPs actually making money on the NBN services & how much congestion the customers will tolerate.
 

Comic Book Guy

Likes Dirt
I moved from TPG ADSL to TPG NBN and it has been fine. Transition was painless and connection stable.
...I've not yet spoken to anyone in my area who is happy with their NBN connection, regardless of supplier.
A lot of problems arise from the shitty Abbott/Turnbull model. If you are in an area that is HFC (cable internet) best of luck. My mum is on HFC, it took a week to get connected and it is up and down constantly.

Telstra are a useless bunch of chunts who are impossible to deal with and I hate them. The old guy down the road has his NBN with Telstra and it is a clusterfuck. Drop outs, connection issues and endless hours on the phone talking to muppets. Considering we are in the same street it is hard to understand why he is having so many issues.

CBG.
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
I have been through the ADSL to HFC NBN sausage machine.

I'm with Internode (AKA TPG) and have had them for both ADSL and now HFC. Our house was 'hot' and already cabled up and just needed a 2m lead from the co-ax socket to the new modem.

It was painful to get installed mainly due to the newness of the HFC activation process for Internode and lack of giving a damn that NBN seem to have perfected. I have heard of the stories when NBN cut you over but then mess up the provisioning and then you are left with nothing. I had a NodePhone VoIP service attached to my ADSL service and due to nuance with the number porting process, the ADSL service had to remain active until the number was ported successfully from the ADSL to NBN service. This prevented the NBN from pulling the plug on our ADSL service before the new NBN phone was connected.

I would get your NBN service connected by Telstra first, go on an month by month plan then churn to the NBN provider of your choice. Telstra seem to have more push than other providers to get things fixed when it all goes south.

I honestly don't have bad things to say about it now that it is in and have only lost signal twice for about 30 minutes after 11pm when the telco planned work maintenence window witching hour starts.

Get it installed leave it alone. I have 50/20 plan now. These are this afternoon stats below and assume that TPG shape the traffic a bit to skim a bit of bandwidth back giving me a 46/18 without raising the eyebrows of the TIO. Make sure you do a speedtest particularly if you make a plan change. The standard Huawei gateway is preconfigured for your initial HFC package and will throttle the upstream unless you alter the config to suit.

Now to watch awesome cat videos in HD till my quota runs out.

 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
I believe most of the issues arise from how congested the service providers run their interconnects to NBN in each of the POIs.

The charges can be rather large, hence the juggle between the SPs actually making money on the NBN services & how much congestion the customers will tolerate.
ISP/RSP is a numbers game.

It doesn't take too much for a few heavy users to drag everything down. The wholesale model doesn't leave much for the ISP to make as they are charged for L2 bandwidth for the backhaul from the customer's modem to the ISP's POP and then also the L3 bandwidth to the internet. Telstra wholesale would also smack you up for an 'ADSL line rental' on top of the other charges.

It is a struggle for any smaller ISP to make $$$. Almost not worth the effort. The more customers means more $$$ and ability to push harder for a better deal from your wholesaler.
 

stirk

Wheel size expert
NBN could even be worse than the fox, cane beetle, or cane toad, or Rolf....

With ADSL2 I get around 10 down, a mate on NBN had massive issues on connection and is paying for 12 down and getting far less on a bad day which is everyday.

Meanwhile 4g can be so much faster and 5g.......

Both govt have failed.
 

sane

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Mr Cruds,

"The standard Huawei gateway is preconfigured for your initial HFC package and will throttle the upstream unless you alter the config to suit."

Can you explain this further please.

"It is a struggle for any smaller ISP to make $$$. Almost not worth the effort. The more customers means more $$$ and ability to push harder for a better deal from your wholesaler."

So only the big boys are going to be shelling out for enough CVC?

So many questions about such a basic thing. There should be no need to have an understanding of how money is flowing between wholesaler & supplier, & who's stitching who up in the preocess. Sometimes, shit just works.
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
Can you explain this further please.
I initially had a 25/5 HFC NBN service. I upgraded to 50/10. The downstream was faster but not the upstream.
Effectively giving me a 50/5 service. The NBN is not at fault here but the ISP should have gave instructions to adjust the bandwidth settings on the modem to suit the faster service.

So only the big boys are going to be shelling out for enough CVC?

So many questions about such a basic thing. There should be no need to have an understanding of how money is flowing between wholesaler & supplier, & who's stitching who up in the preocess. Sometimes, shit just works.
True, the bigger ones have more $$$ and hence more purchasing power. This is probably why the past few years has led to some consolidation with the bigger ISP fish eating the smaller ISP fish.

It is same for LBS vs. buying online in the sense. It isn't right but that seems to be how it is.
 

droenn

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I haven't got any experience yet, but after reading up on different ISPs, I've signed up with AussieBB. Gets installed just after easter weekend.
On TPG for ADSL now, they have been fine for the time I've had them.
OK, finally got up and running yesterday. NBNco had a stop-sell on my node (I figure) for ages, so it was delayed for a bit. However, once allowed through it happened straight away and its working fine. Just went for the 25/5 and got 21/4.7 on initial test around dinner last night.

TPG apparently requires 30 days of notice for a cancellation (ughhh) so I'm stuck paying them for another month. Hopefully supporting a smaller company will pay off with better service (local call centre and first month free for the delay is a good start)
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
OK, finally got up and running yesterday. NBNco had a stop-sell on my node (I figure) for ages, so it was delayed for a bit. However, once allowed through it happened straight away and its working fine. Just went for the 25/5 and got 21/4.7 on initial test around dinner last night.

TPG apparently requires 30 days of notice for a cancellation (ughhh) so I'm stuck paying them for another month. Hopefully supporting a smaller company will pay off with better service (local call centre and first month free for the delay is a good start)
The speed you are getting is quite good though. The real test I think is more so how it performs at night to international sites during Netflix time.

I have Internode which are part of the TPG cartel and it works well enough. Do you have a good reason to change yet?

Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
 

droenn

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I went from TPG to AussieBB. TPG are fine, but NBN gives you more options than the big players. I'd rather support a smaller company (Aussie) with local call centre etc etc.

Netflix is definitely streaming at a higher rate than before, its working well!
 

Boom King

Wheel size expert
Anyone usng iinet? After god knows how many years, I'm pulling the pin on Optus. Fucking useless pack of

S!
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
OK nerds, I've always wanted to know the answer to this: why is it that internet connections 'go bad' after a while and need the modem to be reset?

Recently my internet performance was getting worse; it'd be fine but seemed to stick on larger files, like downloads over 150mb and watching youtube.

But speedtest would still show up to about 32mbps download.

Yesterday, uploading a 2.4gb file took nearly five hours and I finally got on the phone. Obviously I'd power-cycled the modem, disconnected things from the wifi, tried wired and wireless on different devices. No improvement.

After a bit of back and forth on the phone, she got me to reset the modem using a paperclip in the little hole.

A couple of minutes, internet is back and the 2.4gb file uploads in 30 minutes.


So what gives? I never touch the modem, changed no settings.... why doesn't the technology notice it needs resetting? Why would it work perfectly and then suddenly hit a wall and need a reset?

Anyone understand this?
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
It shouldn’t. Certainly not to that extent, unless your connection ended up being throttled for some reason?

I’m sure someone with skillz could have worked out what was wrong (from the SP side that is). The average person has no access to SP skillz.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
I really have no idea - it's a relatively high priced business plan with 1tb/month, so there should be no throttling.
 

Comic Book Guy

Likes Dirt
Like any piece of software your modem/router can get screwed up. Something gets written to memory incorrectly and then it screws everything up. It happens.

Most modem/routers use a stripped down version of Linux called Busybox. Which is very reliable and stable. Sometimes things just go wrong. A restart will use the existing settings which if screwed up just continues the problem. Resetting takes the modem back to factory settings. Sometimes resetting is the only way to fix a problem.

CBG.
 

Tubbsy

quadragenarian
Staff member
Cool thanks.

I thought they were simpler devices, didn't realise there was an os on there.
 
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