Newly Released Bikes General

caad9

Likes Bikes and Dirt
:foreheadslap: I looked at this photo 3 times and it's only now just occurred to me what I was looking at...

Slower on the uptake than I am on the bike....
This doesn't look as bad as it should and I agree that continuing the girth through to the one piece swingarm is a smart move, aesthetically
 

shiny

Go-go-gadget-wrist-thingy
Ibis new logo and graphics are meh. The icing on the cake is the bike stats painted on the downtube. WTF.
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
Last edited:

shiny

Go-go-gadget-wrist-thingy
Enough of this eeb nonsense!

It seem like adjustability is the new black, and mullets are still in vogue...

Crestline 205 VHP.
Crestline Bike Co. & Cascade Components Introduce Their Inaugural Model - The RS 205 VHP
First Ride: Crestline & Cascade Components Team Up to Create a Virtual High Pivot Downhill Bike

Suspension so good it literally (appears to) levitates!
Thasks Dr @beeb came here to post that and got caught up with the ugly e thingy. Looks like forbidden and Santa Cruz had a baby.
 

PJO

in me vL comy
Enough of this eeb nonsense!

It seem like adjustability is the new black, and mullets are still in vogue...

Crestline 205 VHP.
Crestline Bike Co. & Cascade Components Introduce Their Inaugural Model - The RS 205 VHP
First Ride: Crestline & Cascade Components Team Up to Create a Virtual High Pivot Downhill Bike

Suspension so good it literally (appears to) levitates!
There are so many bikes now with the shock mounted low and directly in the path of all the mud and debris thrown from the back wheel and yet no one is making guards to prevent all the crud hitting the shock.
Mondraker have been doing it for years with their zero suspension platform, even they had a guard, albeit it was so tiny that I wonder if it did anything...
Is there some sort of conspiracy between bike and shock manufacturers?
1664423760937.png
 

Mr Crudley

Wheel size expert
There are so many bikes now with the shock mounted low and directly in the path of all the mud and debris thrown from the back wheel and yet no one is making guards to prevent all the crud hitting the shock.
It does seem like a hell of footshot. I'd almost think going one step further and integrating a mudguard into the rear swingarm would be goer.
Mud clearance aside, it would be less of an afterthought provided it can be strong enough to avoid any damage.

I put a small mudguard that is pretty well hidden on the rear of the 5010. If you get a small stone riding between the rear linkage and frame that can't escape then could make a mess. I think the Bronson's or Tallboys came with a little linkage protector thingy but isn't strictly a mudguard.
 
Top