Plastic bags, climate change, renewable energy,

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie

"The observations show a very large increase in the temperature of these heatwaves. Currently such an event is estimated to occur with a return period of 30 years, but similarly frequent heatwaves would have likely been about 4 ºC cooler a century ago. In other words, a heatwave that intense is occurring at least 10 times more frequently today than a century ago," it said.
Houston, I think we have a problem.

All good though - accounting tricks will fix this
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
And more rubbish:


To quote my mate:

Article states it’d remove 200GtC.

IPCC’s 1.5C with low overshoot pathway prescribes -50% emissions by 2030 AND a C-sink of 800GtCO2 (which equals 218GtC).

So C sink is of the needed size, but still need to rapidly decarbonise.

But what does Hansen say about this? Half. 100GtC in his Young People’s Burden paper.

But be sure to let all the politicians know - I’m sure they’ll be more than willing to help out, as before. You know who I mean? The ones logging and clearing as rapidly as they can.
 

droenn

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I don't get why you think its rubbish. Its not being proposed as a stand alone solution, but as a potential way of storing a large part of the carbon burden. Regional restoration projects are all going to be challenged by stakeholders and governments - but this paper is simply demonstrating a model for how those areas could be used to store carbon (and other ecological processes).
 

pink poodle

Clinically Inane
You still own a car, so you aren't really committed anyway. TLDNR.


On a less piss taking note, in every day life we consume goods. Is it better to go to the shopping centre and purchase these items (eg clothes and groceries) or to order on line and have them delivered? Both have Pro/Con aspects, just wondering what people are feeling on this sort of thing? I see a lot of delivery truck action in my tiny Street on the mornings I'm not working.
 

ashes_mtb

Likes Dirt
You still own a car, so you aren't really committed anyway. TLDNR.


On a less piss taking note, in every day life we consume goods. Is it better to go to the shopping centre and purchase these items (eg clothes and groceries) or to order on line and have them delivered? Both have Pro/Con aspects, just wondering what people are feeling on this sort of thing? I see a lot of delivery truck action in my tiny Street on the mornings I'm not working.
Would depend alot on travel distances for both options, number of stops etc. I suspect delivery trucks would potentially be more efficient as a general rule, although in my situation supermarket orders are dispatched from a supermarket 15km away when I've got several of the major ones within a 1.5km radius, so the truck would need to be doing alot of deliveries on its route to be more efficient.
 
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pink poodle

Clinically Inane
I ride to the shops or catch public transport. But you bet I buy most of my clothing and leisure items online. I do however usually opt for post office pick up rather than home drop off, to avoid unnecessary attempts to deliver.

Shopping locations seem to be a mass of resource waste, mostly electricity.
 

ashes_mtb

Likes Dirt
I ride to the shops or catch public transport. But you bet I buy most of my clothing and leisure items online. I do however usually opt for post office pick up rather than home drop off, to avoid unnecessary attempts to deliver.

Shopping locations seem to be a mass of resource waste, mostly electricity.
What and how much you buy is probably more significant than how you get hold of it.

Shopping centres are heinous on many fronts. I always shudder when I walk into one at odd hours when a single supermarket is open and the whole joint is lit up and air conditioned.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
I don't get why you think its rubbish. Its not being proposed as a stand alone solution, but as a potential way of storing a large part of the carbon burden. Regional restoration projects are all going to be challenged by stakeholders and governments - but this paper is simply demonstrating a model for how those areas could be used to store carbon (and other ecological processes).
I meant the article is rubbish in how it frames the proposed solution. If you skim read it, it makes it seem like planting trees will resolve our issues.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
Straya, the land of spin, not science:


Two days earlier, an analysis by US-based researchers and anti-fossil fuel advocates the Global Energy Monitor found if all US$1.3tn worth of LNG developments planned across the globe went ahead they would do at least as much to drive the world into climate catastrophe as new coal investments, possibly more. Australia is a significant player in this drive, with $38bn in investments on the books – fourth behind only the US, Canada or Russia.
There is only solving climate change.

There is no fucking up the planet slightly differently therefore all good.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
We should be so proud:


David Attenborough has highlighted Australia as an “extraordinary” example of a country where people in power remained climate change deniers despite the country facing some of the worst effects of global heating.
Thanks for voting for #jobzngrof you fucking muppets.
 
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