The Fixie Thread

Carlin

Likes Bikes and Dirt
After a little discussion regarding fixies elswheere on Farkin, I thought I would throw this up.

Anyway, I have an old Tange tubed lugged roadie frame from under the house that I am converting into a fixie.

Why? I don't really know, I don't see myself commuting on it as I live in a pretty hilly part of Sydney. So I suppose for the hell of it, to see what all the fuss is about, to see if I actually can ride a fixie. It seems to be the best thing for the frame having sat under the house for so long doing nothing.

Looking at the bike most of the stuff is salvageable, I have figured out that the least I need for the conversion is:

Hubs, spokes, rims,
Drive train: Chainring, Screw on cog, chain
Bar tape
A Little cable housing and a brake cable. (I think a front brake would be a must to begin with)

Anyway I'm really looking forward to the conversion.

So does anyone else here ride a fixie, how do you find it, any tips for the conversion or a beginner?
 
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dunk

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I ride one pretty often, about 80-180 km per week.

Here's mine http://forums.farkin.net/showthread.php?t=51197&highlight=fixed

The conversion is pretty simple, try and find an old track wheel and either respace the rear of the frame by cold setting, or respace the rear hub with some extra spacers if the axle is long enough and redish the wheel if needed.

As I'm using an old Colnago road frame I didn't want to cold set the frame, so I put a longer axle in a Camapag high flange track hub rear hub and respaced it to 126mm to suit the frame. Here's my suggestion to you about this - don't use camy hubs. Being Italian they have to be different and use a different thread to everyone else 10mm x 26tpi. Try and find a longer bolt up axle for that threading:mad: $100 later and I got an axle from the States, if I had used a 10mm x 1mm it's just a trip to the LBS.

The next big thing is what gearing to run, I run 70" (47x18) and find that I can climb most hills easliy and don't spin out too much on the downhills. I've canged my gearing to 65" (42x17) for this weekend as I'll be riding the Cycleops 12 hour at Eastern Creek on saturday solo on my fixed, and don't want to push that gear all day up the hill there.

Pedals are another issue, will you be using clips and straps, or clippless. A lot of people like Eggbeaters as they have four sided entry allowing easier clipping while cranks are turning. I just us some 105 clipless and haven't had anyproblems, but I rareley unclip as I trackstand most times.

Maybe we can get a Farkin fixed ride going soon:D
 

GrubNut

Likes Dirt
I'm pretty keen to build one myself, having been commuting on a singlespeed roadie for about two years and loving it. I'm using a converted freehub on the singlespeed (1981 norco road frame), so i just need to get around to building a fixed rear wheel. A fixed/free rear hub would be nice if i can find one with the right spacing and chainline.
 

Bjern Fita

Likes Bikes
a steel roadie is a great place to start. I was lucky enough to get an old exage equiped peugeot from a mate for free. Stripped the frame, sent it off to Grip who stripped the paint and took off all excess bosses, cables guides and hangers.

I've spent some money on the wheels, levers etc. but in its first incarnation the bike ran freakin' sweet with some new bearings in the old wheels and cassette spacers on the hub to SS it. It's a cheap way to have a sweet bike.

On the wheels, I was lucky enough to pick up a set of Surlys off a bloke in Canberra. I love them and the cartridge bearings will hold me and the hubs in good stead for yonks, so easy to maintain (replace). They rear is 120mm in a 126mm spaced frame, one of the benefits of steel bikes, you can bend it a little with no worries.

If you're looking for a flip-flop hub I would recommend you get a fixed/fixed one as it gives you the option of running whatever combo of fixed cogs and freehubs you want. (I assume that there is slightly less thread engagement putting a free wheel onto the fixed threading due to the machining for a lockring, maybe someone knows better about this than I).

It's filthy at the moment as it's my commuter which I ride every day to work, haven't washed it off since the last rain (and I'm sort of waiting for the BB and headset to cark it so I can be completely finished with the rebuild).
 
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LordNikon

Uber Geek
I'm currently building an old Peugeot roadie into a fixed wheel bike.

Ordered my wheels yesterday. Velocity do a track wheelset with a flip flop rear hub using a rim with a braking surface for around $400 rrp.

I'm having trouble finding a new, non cotter pin cranks, bottom bracket though. Or even just a new axle to use with the same cups.

I can't use the original cranks as they are rusted beyond repair. Anyone know of any french thread bottom brackets I could buy new? Or where to find one second hand?
 

bradh

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Bjern Fita said:
If you're looking for a flip-flop hub I would recommend you get a fixed/fixed one as it gives you the option of running whatever combo of fixed cogs and freehubs you want. (I assume that there is slightly less thread engagement putting a free wheel onto the fixed threading due to the machining for a lockring, maybe someone knows better about this than I).
A fixed/fixed hub is definitely the way to go. The extra width of a freewheel-specific thread is irrelevant, and limits your options.
 

Carlin

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I think the advantage of a flip flop hub would be the possibility of screwing a fixed cog to one side and a freewheel to the other, so if the fixie thing is a bit much in peak hour traffic after a long day at work, flip your wheel around and bingo: SS roadie! I have read stuff about having a different size fixed cog on both sides, but you would have to change your chain over anyway kind of defeating the purpose.

I'm searching for some hubs or wheels at the moment, I may just end up buying some new hubs and going from there. And as for gearing, I think I'll go mid 60s.

Starting to really look forwaed to this project:D
 

craigb

Likes Dirt
white industries do a fixed, fixed plus you can run a freewheel on one side. ive been using mine for 2 years now and its been great. i run a fixed and freewheel setup on mine
 

tu plang

knob
god... this has got me thinking and planning which is dangerous for my wallet. theres an old steel colnago hanging up at work... time to make an offer.
 

LordNikon

Uber Geek
You're not wrong about the wallet part tu plang...

The tally for mine is up to $600 so far and the frame/fork was free! :eek:

$400 wheelset.
$120 stem
$50 bars
$20 brake
$30 lever

Much more to go aswell.

This was supposed to be a cheap bike dammit!
 

tu plang

knob
haha yeah, see im thinking... build up an old retro fixed wheel bike to ride to uni so i can park it anywhere (atm i park my roadbike in a bike room which isnt as convinient as possible) but i know me, and i know this wont turn out cheap at all if i am to do it.
 

Labcanary

Likes Dirt
I have a 1940/50´s commuter that I found down an allyway near me that runs a fixed cog. I´ve yet to get around to restoring it...poor thing is sitting there waiting to be re-sprayed and re-built :(
It is in pretty good nick for it´s age, mostly just surface rust and a helluva lot of paint peeling, although the handlebars and headset have seen better days.
Like a few others, this thread has inspired me - I should get cracking on this project!
 

craigb

Likes Dirt
theres also a fixy ride every saturday morning in melbourne very casual and i do mean casual. corner Elgin and Swanston at 7.30am
 

nick

Likes Dirt
Okay weve heard all your commuter/road fixie stories, what about some fixie mtb storys? Now that would be interesting:rolleyes:...
 
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