Plastic bags, climate change, renewable energy,

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
Which pretty much aligns with what I’ve researched about back burning efficacy:



You can never backburn often enough & widely enough to make a material difference in catastrophic fire danger conditions.

Catastrophic conditions will be more frequent with CC.
 

mike14

Likes Dirt

Freediver

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Which pretty much aligns with what I’ve researched about back burning efficacy:



You can never backburn often enough & widely enough to make a material difference in catastrophic fire danger conditions.

Catastrophic conditions will be more frequent with CC.
I think you're confusing back burning with fuel reduction burns.
 

hifiandmtb

Sphincter beanie
I wasn't clear - true, I am talking about fire reduction burn efficacy.

Check out what's stated in the third last paragraph:

"...Addressing greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of coal, oil & gas must therefore be the highest priority because changes in our climate are increasing the bushfire threat and reducing the effectiveness of current hazard reduction practices."
 
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Oddjob

Wheel size expert
I wasn't clear - true, I am talking about fire reduction burn efficacy.

Check out what's stated in the third last paragraph:

"...Addressing greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of coal, oil & gas must therefore be the highest priority because changes in our climate are increasing the bushfire threat and reducing the effectiveness of current hazard reduction practices."
I'd say that current hazard reduction practices are totally ineffective.

There's a lot of research (here and overseas in places like California) showing that modern fire suppression practices have led to huge increases in fuel in areas that have historically had small but regular fires. The only long term solution would be a really intensive program of selective logging everywhere, to thin out forests, followed by very regular fuel reduction burns.

Ultimately we want the landscape to look like it did before western settlement. Early colonial paintings show much thinner tree cover and the existence of meadows due to regular burning by aboriginals.

I've got no idea what we can do about rainforests that are drying out and becoming more susceptible to fire.

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 

Dales Cannon

Odious Geriatric
Staff member
I was speaking to a Qld Parks ranger who was caught up in fighting some of the fires up here. Great bloke by the way. He said they are either budget strapped, hindered by politics or (mostly) unable to control burn due to weather conditions so the fuel load is increasing year by year. Once a bush fire became a firey's issue they had no restrictions and ran dozers and loaders through to make massive fire breaks.
 

silentbutdeadly

Eats Squid
I was speaking to a Qld Parks ranger who was caught up in fighting some of the fires up here. Great bloke by the way. He said they are either budget strapped, hindered by politics or (mostly) unable to control burn due to weather conditions so the fuel load is increasing year by year. Once a bush fire became a firey's issue they had no restrictions and ran dozers and loaders through to make massive fire breaks.
It's pretty much this...everywhere.
 

The Duckmeister

Eats Squid
Early colonial paintings show much thinner tree cover and the existence of meadows due to regular burning by aboriginals.
Not necessarily due to aboriginal burning, we don't have meadows like in the old paintings in our current environment because our forebears saw them as easy places to chuck buildings on..... The heavily forested areas we have left were always like that, but seen as too hard to clear, so left alone to some extent, so that thick stuff is what's left.
 

Kerplunk

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I'd say that current hazard reduction practices are totally ineffective.

There's a lot of research (here and overseas in places like California) showing that modern fire suppression practices have led to huge increases in fuel in areas that have historically had small but regular fires. The only long term solution would be a really intensive program of selective logging everywhere, to thin out forests, followed by very regular fuel reduction burns.

Ultimately we want the landscape to look like it did before western settlement. Early colonial paintings show much thinner tree cover and the existence of meadows due to regular burning by aboriginals.

I've got no idea what we can do about rainforests that are drying out and becoming more susceptible to fire.

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
I was taught in ecology the thousands of years of burning is a big part of the reason why the bush now burns so well. The mainland’s forests lack tree diversity, it’s dominated by eucalypts that thrive after fire and take over during regenerative growth.. So now we have forests loaded with highly flammable vegetation. Every time the bush burns the less diversity there is. Tassie has the most diverse forrests in Australia because it had the least back burning..
just to add, it’s not just the back burning for the cause also natural fire events..
 

Haakon

veni, vidi, volanti
I was taught in ecology the thousands of years of burning is a big part of the reason why the bush now burns so well. The mainland’s forests lack tree diversity, it’s dominated by eucalypts that thrive after fire and take over during regenerative growth.. So now we have forests loaded with highly flammable vegetation. Every time the bush burns the less diversity there is. Tassie has the most diverse forrests in Australia because it had the least back burning..
just to add, it’s not just the back burning for the cause also natural fire events..
Yep, the setup when the Europeans arrived wasn’t a natural balance everywhere - a universal constant of humanity is they screw with things...
 
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