Post your Roadie

Nath8

Likes Dirt
Guys, I love the bikes above, but why would you wear out your carbon rims with a crap braking system, were all MTBers here, why no discs ?
Hey Ozzy, love your passion and thoughts. To answer why I just bought a non disc roadie was quite simple. I know the UCI and Cycling Australia have now given disc's the green light, BUT my local club, which is a Veterans club has not. Both the Australian vets and Victorian vets have not approved the use of disc's. I'm being told it's probably 2 years away! Bunch of old buggers resisting change.
So with that in mind, I bought my new Focus. Loving it by the way :whoo:
 

mik_git

Likes Bikes and Dirt
possibly a few reasons, if you want a certain bike,it may not come in a disc version, like my Look didn't. Also when you're going super spendy lightweight, a disc bike will (may) have to be beefed up/redesigned to handle discs, those few grams may be a deal breaker for mr weight weeny. Some people just maybe don't want or need discs for what they are doing. Often bike manufactures don't spec nice wheels with top end bikes as they assume you want the choice/have nice wheels, but either way, say you have a nice set of 2-3K wheels, what you don't really want is for them to be completely redundant from buying a new bike and then have to shell out $$$$ for new wheels...
I'll admit it took me a while to go disc on mtb partially cash related, but my first set, avid juicy's were OK but not that great, then my XT, took an age to get used to, and I can still live with some well set up V's... my first road bike, ultegra brakes/pads and DT swiss wheels... truly horrifying, well below acceptable braking in the dry, and scary as all shit in the wet. Going swiss stop pads helped but...ugh. New bike I went Mavic exalith (ultegra brakes), and they are truly astounding, wet or dry. Not as powerful as my XT mtb brakes (either set), but more consistent and better feel. If they made them form mtb i'd happily go without discs. But they don't

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for discs, they're geat, just putting forward ideas why someone might not buy a road bike with them.
 

ozzybmx

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Discs have been about for a while, CX has had discs for 4-5 years if you wanted them... only in the last 2 years has it become that every CX bike has discs. They were originally saying that discs were only going to be used for wet CX races, nek minnit ! You cant sell a rim braked CX now.

I was only asking the question, wanting to know why people chose rims brakes over disc. No big deal... just the future proofing of your expensive bike.
 
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Psimpson7

Likes Dirt
This just got delivered. My wife's new Roadie. Just charging it up before I try and pair the etap....... wait for a fuckwits thread post shortly!

 

ozzybmx

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Very nice... just seen a work mate of mine's Canyon Ultimate this morning, Di2 and the 1 piece aero bars, awesome looking bikes.
 

schred

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Ozzybmx, what's the dealio with aero bikes? Why not more popular? Seems to me with the UCI aero rule relaxation there's fewer reasons to get a climbing (non aero) bike, unless you are racing that category or live on/ ride the hills a lot. I see the two styles merging, or creating another type of ride more likely these days.
 

Alo661

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Ozzybmx, what's the dealio with aero bikes? Why not more popular? Seems to me with the UCI aero rule relaxation there's fewer reasons to get a climbing (non aero) bike, unless you are racing that category or live on/ ride the hills a lot. I see the two styles merging, or creating another type of ride more likely these days.
Too stiff to ride everyday. Doesn't exactly encourage you to get out and ride because you'll feel every bump in the road. Aero road frames are designed to be stiffer than TT frames as well. TT frames your locked in one position and never sprinting. Aero road frames are designed around sprinting. No flex in the frame is preferred, so all power output goes into the pedal stroke. Endurance/road race/climbing even TT frames are designed with comfort (built in flex or what marketing departments like to call "compliance") in mind for the rider, so you can ride longer without fatiguing. Go ride a BT track frame out on the road from half an hour and you'll know a next level of stiffness (and soreness).

The other reason is weight. Aero frames weigh more trying to achieve the stiffness and aerodynamic advantage. It requires more material than a simple endurance or road race frame with inbuilt flex. Customers love to make their bike lighter even if said customer weighs over 100kgs....

Same two reasons can be somewhat applied to deep carbon wheels as well.

Simple fact is, they are popular with people who race crits or flat short road races where it comes down to a sprint finish. That's why only 1-3 guys in any Tour team will actually ride on the aero bike. Why suffer the harshness of a stage that you have no chance in, when you can just roll through it on something comfortable to save your body.
 

ozzybmx

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Ozzybmx, what's the dealio with aero bikes? Why not more popular? Seems to me with the UCI aero rule relaxation there's fewer reasons to get a climbing (non aero) bike, unless you are racing that category or live on/ ride the hills a lot. I see the two styles merging, or creating another type of ride more likely these days.
As Alo661 says, they are great for short rides and anyone who races, but they are pretty rough on you.

My last roadie was a BH G6 (aero bike), that would have shook the teeth out of your mouth. Was a KOM machine but picked up every bump on the road, just had to point it, pedal and that thing took off like a rocket.

Nearly all the aero bikes seem to come with a standard crank and 11:23/11:25 cassettes, so to start riding one as an allrounder, you might need to swap out cassettes and cranks to get it hill worthy.

A few of the aero bikes share the same geometry as the all rounders, I believe the Spech Venge and Tarmac have the same geometry and also the Giant Propel and TCR, so its really down to what you need from the bike, speed and aero or climbing and a bit more comfort.

Theres no doubt that aero bikes look the best and score top points on the cibo wank factor scale.
 

schred

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Thanks guys, good points for why existing aero bikes don't make good road bikes. Notwithstanding the stiffness issues, isn't it possible some aero inspired principles might trickle down, I admit I am probably underestimating the traditional element.
 

Mr Crudley

Eats Squid
Not my roadie but wish it was. This tasty 'nago used to be on display in a case at Clarence St Cycles in Sydney for some time. It disappeared for 1/2 a lifetime and just popped up again.

The Scummery folks said it is 1 of 2 made and upwards in value of $100k.

Behold...



Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
Not my roadie but wish it was. This tasty 'nago used to be on display in a case at Clarence St Cycles in Sydney for some time. It disappeared for 1/2 a lifetime and just popped up again.

The Scummery folks said it is 1 of 2 made and upwards in value of $100k.

Behold...



Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
Probably weighs a ton with all that gold on it.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
 

BLKFOZ

Likes Dirt
Trek Boone

Picked up my new Boone during the week.
It's a pretty strange build but what I was after.
9/46 e13 cassette with a 40 front ring. 32mm carbon wheels.
I haven't decided on tyres yet. It will be used as both a road bike and for fireroad adventures so thinking somewhere around 32-35mm and fairly slick like the 2nd hand Re-fuse on it now or Hutchinson Overides.
Weighed in at 8.06kg before I added pedals.
 

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nzhumpy

Googlemeister who likes bikes and scandal
Here's my latest addition to the shed

20171201_155714_resized[7754].jpg


After a few beers and a spontaneous bid I picked this up off Ebay for an absolute steal.
 
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