The QUICK question thread.....

HamboCairns

Likes Bikes and Dirt
While on the chain theme, is there a place that sells KMC X10 chains (or even a Shimano 10sp chain) at a reasonable price? I'm pretty sure $50 is a bit overpriced!
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
Ok. Looks like I’ll be running the chain. Thanks.
2nd question. I know there’s been a lot written about this but I’m going to upgrade the ratchet in my DT Swiss 350’s from 18 to either 36 or 54.
I’m a 100kg kitted and I put a bit of power down to the pedals.
Am I asking for trouble going 54th or should I stick to the 36 for a safer bet.
Ive heard the 54 can be a bit fragile for bigger units like me.
36t all the way.

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nzhumpy

Googlemeister who likes bikes and scandal
Caleb Clarke goes ok from all accounts from the Aus media...big boots to fill.

Chances of the Wallabies pulling out an ambush or two at ANZ and Suncorp?
 

Tubbsy

Flying a Scotsman
Staff member
Caleb Clarke goes ok from all accounts from the Aus media...big boots to fill.

Chances of the Wallabies pulling out an ambush or two at ANZ and Suncorp?
Hmmm maybe?

Wallabies played a more entertaining game than I've seen from them in a long time, but the All Blacks punished them early in the second and that was it.

I see encouraging signs, but they're not there yet.
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
Can I mix and match chains?
I’ve got 3/4 of a SRAM 11sp chain (NFI why I have most of a chain) and enough left over KMC links to make a full chain.
They seem to go together fine but concerned SRAM might have an inbuilt detection device and self destruct when I try to run it.

I once put maybe 6 links of brand new kmc chain in with a slightly too short used SRAM chain like Hale Inc appears to have done above. It worked well enough, while waiting for the replacement to arrive.
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
That’s because it’s not so fragile for a big unit or the noticeable difference between a 36 and 54 is negligible ?
The skip from 36 to 54 poe is noticeable but I would prefer to keep my teeth intact.

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Tim_the_Clyde

Likes Dirt
Ok. Looks like I’ll be running the chain. Thanks.
2nd question. I know there’s been a lot written about this but I’m going to upgrade the ratchet in my DT Swiss 350’s from 18 to either 36 or 54.
I’m a 100kg kitted and I put a bit of power down to the pedals.
Am I asking for trouble going 54th or should I stick to the 36 for a safer bet.
Ive heard the 54 can be a bit fragile for bigger units like me.
I’m a fair bit heavier than you and have run a 54T upgrade for over 2 years. Applied dt grease once. Never skipped a beat.


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dirtdad

Likes Bikes
Do people still use marine grease on headsets or with sealed bearings do you not use grease at all
'On' as in on the outside of the bearings?
I pack it in them for sure. (Shields off, pack it, shields back on. Usually not filled enough.)
Much less outside them. Maybe a little when installing as moorey put it.
Too much just seems to attract dust and crud.
 

Oddjob

Wheel size expert
Do people still use marine grease on headsets or with sealed bearings do you not use grease at all
Grease (or retaining compound) on all bearing to metal contact.

Depending on the bearing its also worth popping the seals, carefully, and packing extra grease.

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link1896

Wheel size expert
I have always taken the stance that grease in bearings, from the likes of NSK/NTN/fag is there to prevent corrosion in shipping (ignore the sealed bag for a moment) and replace it from day zero for critical applications. NSK’s literature details regreasing single row radial bearings to increase service life, but it’s buried deep in the 500 page document. Who benefits most from short bearing life? It’s always a pig of a job, increasing bearing life with quality grease with a higher fill amount pays dividends in my mind.

Most successful application myself was Subaru timing pulleys. Mounted to the block, 150mm from the radiator, rough gig for a bearing under pretty decent load at elevated temperatures. When the idler seized, its was good night entire engine with all valves smashing into pistons. Customers engines I’d worked on, they would come back with belt pulleys still running clean and lubed at 150k km. Factory timing interval was 100k km.


Yes, getting seals out can be tricky.
 
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